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FAVORITES FROM ARTPRIZE 2010: (from left) Beili Liu’s “Lure/Wave,” photo by Brian Kelly, courtesy of ArtPrize; Ryan Roth’s “Wannabe CEOs,” photo by Kim Kibby; and Young Kim’s “Salt and Earth (Garden for Patricia),” photo by Brian Kelly, courtesy of ArtPrize.


by Kelli Kolakowski | kelli@revuewm.com


ArtPrize Brings Robust Competition


added a new element, but has made it easier for artists whose entries are musi- cal or performance-based to be heard and seen. With the addition of St. Cecilia’s Music Center as the eighth exhibition center, you can be sure that when you walk in, a menagerie of sounds will come your way. Though the competition remains much the same structur-


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PSYCHOLOGICAL THRILLER: Alex Schweder La’s “Evaporative Buildings” used mechanically induced mist and film projections to create a spooky experience. The piece, installed at the UICA, earned the International Juried


Award in ArtPrize 2010. PHOTO: KIM KIBBY REVUEWM.COM | SEPTEMBER 2011 | 45


HE INAUGURAL ARTPRIZE put Grand Rapids on the map as a place where art is loved and where conversations of art are fluent. ArtPrize 2010 exploded with more participants, venues and visitors and added the exhibition center concept. This year, as the competition gears up for its third round, the emphasis may shift from what you see to what you hear.


ArtPrize 2011 has not necessarily


ally, the organization of ArtPrize has added an important new member. Catherine Creamer has joined the team as the new executive director/COO of ArtPrize. “I became involved with the opportunity here,” Creamer


said. “I’ve worked in the creative field with furniture… I’ve always been involved in ArtPrize and I’ve seen it both years. I’ve been delighted and a big fan of ArtPrize and when I heard that the position was open, I was really excited.”


“We never say bigger is better at ArtPrize … We want to promote


the diversity of art.” —CATHERINE CREAMER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR/COO


Creamer is no stranger to business endeavors. She has held


ARTPRIZE 2011 Sept. 21– Oct. 9 164 venues, mostly in downtown Grand Rapids FREE!


artprize.org, blog.artprize.org


numerous leadership positions, including those with Herman Miller and Kendall College of Art and Design, among others. With an art background herself (she is a trained textile artist), she has also served on the Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park executive committee for the last eight years and is president of the West Michigan Environmental Action Council. Though she is involved in numerous undertakings, Creamer is excited to focus her lens on ArtPrize. “I look forward to experiencing it in


my new role… [getting] an up-close-and- personal view of ArtPrize,” she said. “In the past, my personal experience was as a volunteer and attendee with my family. I am delighted this year to — I imagine — be involved in most aspects of the event. It’s an incredible learning curve for me …


I know that the three weeks will be full of new experiences.” Though there have been a few small additions to ArtPrize


this year, the numbers may appear smaller than years past. But don’t be fooled; the competition is still alive and well. “We never say bigger is better at ArtPrize,” Creamer said.


“It’s still incredibly robust. We do know that some of the art is a lot larger. Some of the exhibition centers are not exceeding their numbers, but showing larger work. We want to promote the diversity of art.” n


SCENE


SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING | SCHEDULE


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