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ARTS ISSUE


Brentano String Quartet


Saturday, September 24 8 PM Dalton Center Recital Hall WMU, Kalamazoo


SFJAZZ Collective


Friday, October 21 8 PM Dalton Center Recital Hall WMU, Kalamazoo


Sounds from the North Sea


Friday, October 28 7:30 PM Wellspring Theater Epic Center, Kalamazoo


Liszt Bicentennial


Friday, November 11 8 PM Dalton Center Recital Hall WMU, Kalamazoo


White Nights


Friday, December 9 7:30 PM Wellspring Theater Epic Center, Kalamazoo


Opera Grand


Rapids 161 Ottawa Ave. NW, Grand Rapids operagr.com, (616) 451-2741


Gather up any preconceived notions about tra- ditional opera, grab a leash and take them for a walk. “A lot of people think opera is this really dry, stuffy, antiquated genre of performance art. But the truth is, modern opera is active, vibrant and fully articulated – far from the stereotypical park-and-bark delivery that is commonly asso- ciated with opera theatre,” says Sarah Mieras, communications manager at Opera Grand Rapids. Park and bark – the tired operatic art of planting oneself onstage and yelping unintel- ligibly – is not a skill Opera Grand Rapids looks


La Boheme KALAMAZOO SYMPHONY


ORCHESTRA 359 S. Kalamazoo Mall 100, Kalamazoo kalamazoosymphony.com, (269) 349-7759


One word to describe this year’s lineup: diverse. La Traviata is a story of romantic in- trigue, reckless gambling, and death. American Dance interprets the music of Phillip Glass and John Adams, while Symphonie Fantastique features artist Marc-Andre Hamelin and has been hailed as “fascinating.”


La Traviata (Sept. 17); American Dance (Jan. 21); Spanish Rhapsody (March 10); Mozart & Schubert (Oct. 21-22); Symphonie Fantastique (Feb. 17); Tchaikovsky & Brahms (April 20).


WEST MICHIGAN SYMPHONY 425 W. Western Ave #409, Muskegon wsso.org, (231) 726-3231


Starting off by playing Billboard Hits from the 60s and following up by bringing back audience favorite Alexander Buzlov and his haunting cello for Brahms Symphony No. 3, the West Michigan Symphony has a bold, but creative lineup. Adding to the creativity is Carnival of the Animals and Beethoven and Blue Jeans, among other intriguing shows.


“Oh What a Night!” Billboard Hits from the 1960s (Sept. 16-17); Brahms Symphony No. 3 (Oct. 28-29); Dvorak Symphony No. 8 (Nov. 18-19); Holiday Pops (Dec. 9-10); Carnival of the Animals (Feb. 3-4); Cirque de la Symphonie (March 2-3); Beethoven and Blue Jeans (March 23-24); Pictures at an Exhibition (June 1-2). n


for when recruiting professional opera singers from all over the world. The modern opera singer is a bona-fide actor. Plus, OGR has subtitles. For the 2011/2012 season, OGR will present three classic performances that should make good on Mieras’s promise. Il Trovatore is the spooky tale of a gypsy hag’s quest for revenge, appropriately timed for Halloween, and gives us that song from Bad Santa where Billy Bob Thorton smashes open the department store safe with a sledgeham- mer. The Magic Flute is a fantastical voyage to ancient civilizations, featuring projection images from the Hubble Space Telescope integrated into the set. La Boheme is pure operatic tragedy in Paris’s Latin Quarter and provides the framework for the Broadway play RENT.


Il Trovatore (Oct. 28-29); The Flute Magic (Feb. 3-4); La Boheme (May 4-5).


2011.2012 SEASON Respect tradition. Promote innovation.


TICKETS ON SALE NOW! FONTANACHAMBERARTS.ORG


269 382 7774 | 359 S Kalamazoo Mall | Suite 200 | Kalamazoo Michigan 49007 | 42 | REVUEWM.COM | SEPTEMBER 2011


SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE


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