This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE // BEATING THE TOUR BLUES BEATING TOUR BLUES


WE ALL KNOW THE FEELING, END OF TOUR BRINGS SOME PRETTY HEFTY BLUES, SAT BACK IN THE OFFICE WISHING YOU WERE STILL CHINNING PINTS OF GOD KNOWS WHAT. BUT HOW DO WE BEAT THOSE BAD FEELINGS? JAMES CATLIN FINDS OUT...


CURING THE TOUR BLUES - A SELF HELP GUIDE


As a rugby player is there anything more challenging than beating the Tour Blues? After months of anticipation you have just spent the last few days, or week if you’re lucky (except your liver and bank balance), in the company of your best mates - singing, sweating and smashing it up until you ran out of time. Then it hits......…you’ve got to go home. The empty feeling like someone has just pulled out your power cord. After suffering particularly badly from Stockholm Tens Syndrome, not as famous as the other syndrome but no less dramatic, I felt I needed a plan to get rid of those awful Tour Blues. Here are some tips to get you through. First thing when you get back, get in the


shower you stink. 48+ hours swimming in alcohol and enchanting the opposition on the pitch, and the opposite sex on the dance floor, with the crazy footwork has left you


pretty grim, particularly after the delayed flight and cab ride. Next up stop eating McDonalds, it will just aide the rollercoaster of Yay ‘remember when you had to her/ him?’ to Boo ‘I just wish I could go back’. Try instead for those tour rarities ‘Fruit’ and ‘Veg’ or anything that comes between 2 slices of bread. Remove all tour paraphernalia – wristbands, free tournament t-shirts, bring- alongs etc, last thing you need is your boss wondering why you have a lego man on you or for you to golf ball his mug of tea. The next stage is to get yourself on to


facebook upload your pics, put up your witty, topical in-joke status update and add all your brand new best mates. Getting those one or two messages and likes on your status lets you know you are not alone and still loved. This must be treated with caution however and you need to slowly wean yourself off from checking every 3 minutes to 15, to half hour, to an hour, until back to your normal usage otherwise you may never truly re-engage with life. The next one is an


important one, you need to sort yourself I’d say at least 3 tour stories. Stick to the truth so you mean them, but they need to be funny (so that’s why you go on tour) but they need to be relatively sociably acceptable. Nothing that is getting anyone sacked, divorced or disowned. Not unless you never want to get tour blues again as you’ll not be either invited or allowed to go. Finally you need to immerse yourself


back into normal life where you are allowed to point using your finger and can say the number 12 again. I know we have avoided it till this point but this includes training, you need to hit the gym or get the next club session. This self inflicted pain will really be a shot in the arm of reality for everybody. But if you reach this point and nothing has hit the spot, there’s nothing left for it but to lay down the deposit for next years’ tour, call up all your shufflin’ mates (including newly acquired) and board the Jaeger Train – one leaving every hour, it’s just a case of finding the platform!


ON A RECENT TOUR TO STOCKHOLM MEMBERS OF THE UK RUGBY SEVENS TEAM (BELOW) FOUND A GREAT WAY TO BEAT THE BLUES... BY NOT COMING OFF TOUR! AND SOME RATHER GAY ATTIRE DURING PRIDE WEEK!


Issue 4 / www.ukrugbysevens.com / 63


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68