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OPEN LEVEL


TIM GEAR EVANS AGE: 30


POSITION: 15 S – CENTRE, 7 S – PROP HEIGHT: 185CM WEIGHT: 95KGS


CLUB: DINGS CRUSADERS


Tim Gear-Evans (Baggy) is a no nonsense centre that enjoys nothing more than running into people. At just turned 30, he is moving into the twilight of his rugby career but has been reinvigorated by Sevens. Tim started playing rugby at Under 7 s and


quickly became transfixed with the game, especially the physicality! From 13 years old through 18, and supported by his family, he completed an 80 mile round trip to Bath two or three times a week for training and games. This culminated in playing in some of the most competitive Bath age group teams and united sides of their day. “My first experience of playing for the Bath United side was alongside Phil de Glanville, the Sale team-sheet of the day names a young Mark Cueto, so there were some fairly handy players on the field”. Also in the under 21 team of the time were players like Sam Cox, Olly Barkley and Alex Crockett. Tim decided


to move his rugby into Wales whilst at university and started playing at Ebbw Vale. He took a trip to Kansas in his second year of Uni and fell into a Kansas City Blues 7s team that consisted of three Eagles players. “This was my first taste of sevens and I loved it. We got to travel a lot, there was always a party atmosphere and it was just so much faster and more entertaining to play in than fifteens”. After suffering with numerous injury setbacks


and surgical procedures all incurred through rugby (including three shoulder ops, two knee reconstructions and a dislocation fracture of the ankle) Tim decided to take a back step from rugby and made his way into the commercial world. “Looking back it was a tough decision but I don’t regret not chasing the dream with rugby. It’s a fantastic career, but it is such a short period in your life, I don’t think many players recognise that, getting a foot in the door of the commercial world was a good idea for me”. After a year out of the game Tim moved to Bristol and soon got bullied into preseason training at Dings Crusaders where he has played for the last 6 years. In 2008 Tim played his first game for Blue


Storm in the Newquay Surf Sevens, this was followed up in 2010 with appearances at Bath sevens and a voyage to La Manga for the Super Star Sevens, which Blue Storm Won. At the start of 2011 Tim joined Alex Waite (founder of Blue Storm) to help organise the team. The decision was made to rebrand and become Storm7 and to start stepping up the involvement at tournaments.


SOCIAL LEVEL


MIKE ROLLASON – AKA BRUMMIE MIKE AGE: 26


POSITION: UTILITY BACK HEIGHT: 184CM WEIGHT: 89KG CLUB: DERBY RFC


From the West Midlands, Mike started playing rugby at the age of 13 for his local club Old Halesonians. This is where he developed his skills playing in various positions in the back line throughout the age groups from 10 to 15, which today make him a very versatile player. After completing his degree at Aberystwyth University, Mike moved to Derby and now plays for Derby RFC. During the summer, Mike is kept busy with the more important aspects of rugby; sevens tournaments, and rugby tours! Mike plays for The Legion, a successful sevens team made up of Aberystwyth Old Boys, and this year has been instrumental in starting up a new sevens outfit


in the East Midlands, Nottingham U7s. Mike is also the brains behind the Teamlink Titans touring squad, who over the last 5 years have been hitting European 7s and 10s tournaments, with silverware success in the Stockholm 10s (plate winners in 2010 & 2011, bowl winners in 2008) and St Gallen 10s (cup winners in 2010). In 2012 the Teamlink Titans will be competing in the Las Vegas Invitational 7s and the rumour is they will also be hitting the UK circuit. Why do you play sevens? I love playing rugby, and when the 15s season comes to a close, I use to find myself at a bit of a dead end through the summer. This is where sevens came in! I now love playing sevens through the summer as a great way of keeping fit, but more importantly, prancing round in fancy kit! It is also a great way for me to keep in contact and regularly see friends from all across the UK. What tournaments stick in your mind? Being the first sevens tournament that I played in, I will always have a soft spot for the Aberystwyth Rugby 7s. More recently I enjoyed a great weekend at Solstice 7s in with the Nottingham U7s, which I will look forward to again next year. The DKRFC Summer 7s has probably been my most enjoyable tournament this year as I played for The Legion, who I then took out in for an epic


night in my home city, Birmingham. What are the highlights of your rugby career? The highlights of my career came early, with Worcestershire & Herefordshire county honours at u17s & u18s, followed by North Midlands Honours at u19s. Since then the social element of rugby has taken over somewhat, and now I aspire to earn Man of Tour status.


“Alex and I had a good chat and decided to change a few things. That was in February, we had no sponsors, no kit, and a hand full of players! We got lucky by getting Double Art Media to support us and from there we secured Belief as our kit supplier. To top that off we got Stowford Press as our main sponsor!” On the pitch things have gone well too.


Storm7 have won two tournaments (La Manga and Devon7s), made two Cup semi finals (Rugby Rocks and Newquay) and runners up in the plate at West Country. I’ve had a blast this summer; it’s been great to get on the pitch and to organise off it as well. We’ve had a good spine to the squad and played some decent rugby! We’re going to be growing so watch out for the Storm coming... www.storm7rugby.com


Issue 4 / www.ukrugbysevens.com / 55


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