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MONTHLY // TEAM REVIEWS WOMEN’S SEVENS


PHOTOGRAPHY: PAPAYA PHOTOGRAPHY WOODEN SPOON


Wooden Spoon by name but definitely not by nature!!! The Wooden Spoon Womens 7s team has played in 6 sevens tournaments this season and been victorious in 5, achieving wins against some of the strongest teams on the circuit and a double victory over England at the Rugby Rocks tournament. The current form of the victorious


Women’s team is in no small part due to the terrific management and coaching team that Karen Findlay, former Scotland captain and international and now current Scotland coach, set out at the beginning of the season to put together, with a clear direction of ensuring that players from all four home nations were given the unique opportunity of coming to play together and represent Wooden Spoon playing an exciting brand of sevens. To date over 23 players represented the


Womens 7s team this season, with England captain Katy McLean and team mates Francesca Mathews and Rachael Burford, playing alongside Ireland’s Lynn Cantwell and Jo O’Sullivan, Scotland’s Katy Green, Sarah Dixon and captain Susie Brown, and Welsh stars Amy Day and Jamie Kift. All have run out in Spoon’s red, white, blue and green and contributed to taking home titles at Kinsale, Rugby Rocks, West Country, London


Church and the inaugural women’s tournament at Middlesex 7s, where the final match was played on the hallowed turf of Twickenham in front of Sky Sports cameras. “This season has been fantastic on and off


the field, the players have been a delight to work with and have totally grasped how special it is to get the chance to play for Wooden Spoon, and as one team as opposed to against one another as per the Six Nations. The players consider it to be an honour to go out and do their best for Wooden Spoon. The team never forget that they are there representing the charity, volunteering at every opportunity and raising funds for disadvantaged children and young people across the UK and Ireland” says Findlay. The Wooden Spoon Women, like the Men’s


team, always provide their time for free to the charity yet play as though their future is riding on it. The passion that these players show to the charity was none more evident when the team were double booked in competitions, the West Country 7s in Bath and the Church 7s at Grasshoppers RFC on the same weekend. Returning to the West Country 7s as defending


champions and on the back of their recent victory over England at Rugby Rocks, the pressure was on but the team did not disappoint and once again managed to secure a nail biting win against England to retain the title. While one Women’s side took on the West, a


second Wooden Spoon Women’s team turned out for the London Church 7s and again brought home the title to the charity’s head office in Frimley, Surrey. The fact that Spoon was able to produce


two title winning teams on the same weekend is testament to the widening player based and inclusive environment that the management team has strived to create this season. The teams always play with a never-say-die attitude and never forget why they are playing. “I am immensely proud of what the team


has achieved this year, and the efforts of all the coaches and managers who give up their time to make it all happen” says Findlay. “I just want to take this opportunity to thank all the players and the team behind them for of all of their fantastic efforts and just hope that we can continue our success.” You can always tell when the Wooden Spoon


Women are playing in a 7s tournament because the presence of the charity’s striped wristband increases exponentially! After all there is no better delivery agent than a victorious team! Officially launched in 2007, the Wooden


Spoon rugby teams play to increases the profile of Wooden Spoon and ensure that the charity can continue to have a positive impact on helping disadvantaged children and the current winning streak of the Women is definitely doing that.


Issue 4 / www.ukrugbysevens.com / 49


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