This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
At present the following projects are receiving support:


The Scarlet Macaw in Costa Rica The Parrot Society has part-funded this conservation project based on the Osa Peninsular, Costa Rica (Pacific coast) since 2004. The regular field work includes protecting the macaws from poaching activities, installing, maintaining and monitoring nest-boxes as well as conducting an education programme in local schools. The Parrot Society UK also helps fund research projects of different types. At present a genetic study is being under taken under the title “Genetic Structure and Variability of the Scarlet Macaw populations in Costa Rica”. A paper will be published on the results of the study later this year and this will be accessible to interested members on the PSUK website along with other published papers produced by the project.


Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo in Australia Of our six current conservation projects this is the project that we have supported for the longest and was the one first supported by the late John Mollindinia. The main objective of the project is to place tin around the trunks of nesting trees to prevent goannas (large lizards) climbing


8 BIRD SCENE


them and feeding on eggs and baby cockatoos. The following report gives an excellent insight into the project.


I am pleased to report that the birds still appear to be doing well, most species travelling between water holes vital to their existence. A recent clash between conservationists and tree loggers cited the Barraband as vulnerable but that is not the case as their habitat range covers almost two thirds of New South Wales, a vast area. There is still a fair amount of trapping to do particularly on playing fields and golf courses where the cockatoos cause a great deal of damage. It is fairly demanding as I am the only licensed government trapper left to do that type of work.


The funding from The Parrot Society UK came through OK, thank you for that. Fuel is one of the main issues now when travelling vast distances the grant helps with tyres etc: Last season was a very good breeding time for the Major Mitchell’s cockatoos. It is important that I go out when the Mitchell’s try to find nesting sites as a large number of Corellas are moving into the region and they monopolise the nesting trees, sadly I have to destroy these birds otherwise the Major Mitchell’s (being placid) won’t defend their own nests. I only address this issue on our tinned trees. The


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