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Spotlight


Abacus Lighting Edgbaston





The Big Switch On: Edgbaston Illuminated


Warwickshire vs. Leicestershire is Edgbaston’s first game under the new floodlights


As part of a £30 million development, Warwickshire County Cricket Club staged its first floodlit match against Leicestershire. The new floodlights at Edgbaston were used to great effect for the first time on the 15th July. The new lights are


seen as a big opportunity for the ground, as it can now look forward to hosting more


evening matches and welcoming bigger crowds.


The unique, state of the art floodlights


were specially manufactured and installed by Midlands based Abacus Lighting, who were responsible for recent installations at


40


Lords, Kent The Oval and Trent Bridge. The cantilevered masts incorporate 320 Challenger 3 floodlights with precision reflector systems, which ensure tight beam control, reducing overspill and directing light into the ground where it is needed and, most importantly, away from the surrounding local residential area. Colin Povey, Chief Executive,


Warwickshire County Cricket Club


commented; “The new flood lighting and


redevelopment of the ground will


create opportunities for the Club, and put Edgbaston and the city of Birmingham on the cricketing map, bringing supporters from all over the world to the city.


Abacus Lighting Tel: 01623 511 111 W: www.abacuslighting.com


Contact:


“Going forward, Edgbaston wil be able to host ECB domestic matches that play into the hours of darkness, as well as complying with ICC regulations for Twenty20 matches, which means we can hose ICC World Twenty20 games at Edgbaston.


Paul Wilson, UK Sports Director at Abacus Lighting comments; “It is tremendous that our company has played a major role in the development of these world class facilities. Our floodlight and mast design is state of the art and manufactured here in the UK – it’s completely unique in Edgbaston”.


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