This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LIFESTYLE GADGETS


TOMORROW’S WORLD TODAY


Mind control, robots in the home, medical mirrors? Could these science-fiction-esque technologies become a reality in the very near future? Olivia Solon takes a look at what is around the corner


TODAY, YOUR mobile phone probably has more computing power than the whole of NASA had in 1969 when it first sent astronauts to the moon. Yet we have seamlessly integrated these devices into our lives to the point where we are now more likely to forget our wallets than our mobile phones when we go out. So too have we accepted iPods, Bluetooth, Oyster cards and gaming systems, such as Kinect, where your body is the controller. Moore’s Law, however, dictates that computing power doubles roughly every two


years, which means that designers and engineers are churning out innovations that increasingly stretch the boundaries of expectation and imagination. We have less time to acclimatise to one technology before a new one emerges. Thanks to the increasing miniaturisation and sophistication of microprocessors,


there are a number of key areas where headway is being made. Some of the main trends are objects and information becoming more interconnected and intelligent; robots beginning to creep into the home; and people finding ways to enhance their flesh-and-blood bodies with chips and sensors. It seems like the sci-fi visions of movies such as Minority Report are becoming a reality. Here are some of the technologies and products that we could find entering our lives over the coming decade.


60 businesslife.co August/September 2011


Mind control Electroencephalograph (EEG) technology has been around for years, but has recently evolved so that it is now affordable enough to be placed into personal devices. Emotiv’s brain computer interface products, such as the Epoc headset, allow the user to manipulate their computer without using their hands. Users wear a simple call-centre-style headset, which has sensors that sit on your forehead and detect brain activity. By merely visualising the movement of the mouse across your screen, you can control the device. More playful applications for the technology will soon become available. Japanese company Neurowear has created a novelty cat-ear hairband, called Necomimi, that is worn in the normal way but features sensors that pick up on brain signals and convert them into visible actions – in this case by wiggling the cat ears. The ears twitch through a range of different positions, which correspond to different brain activity. So when you concentrate, the ears point upwards and when you relax the ears flop down and forwards. The result is a kick-ass pair of ears to make anyone at a fancy-dress party jealous.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80