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TICKETING VENNERSYS Kerry Lee, executive director W


hen working with other ticketing system suppliers


on combined/destination tickets, there would need to be an agreed protocol for exchanging unique identification numbers between systems to aid the redemption process and ensure that funds are allocated correctly. This would require the full coopera- tion and participation of the attractions as well. They're unlikely to simply agree to split the


KERRY LEE


costs evenly, so proportionality will play a signifi cant factor, as will simple protectionism. It would be necessary to fi nd some way of cross-referencing tickets to ensure authenticity and aid accurate redemption. This would probably require some kind of


representative industry body to be set up to determine the best approach and provide technical guidelines and protocols. Sounds easy, but vested interests may make the task diffi cult to achieve. If visitor attractions put pressure on their ticketing providers to participate, it’s more likely to happen. The real issues will be whether or not the


ticketing providers and attractions will be willing to work with each other to provide the solution, the fear being that they may


lose competitive advantage and identity, or dilute visitor numbers and marketing spend effectiveness by participating. Just as there are lead attractions in a given


locale, it’s also likely lead ticketing providers will emerge based on the efficacy of their systems and the relative seniority of their customers. It’s reasonable to assume that the lead ticketing providers will drive the schemes with the backing of their customers and so may wish to secure a share of the resulting revenue to fairly refl ect the effort expended. Destination marketing offers distinct possibilities, but there are many attendant barriers to implementation. Strong individual ticketing offers will always play a key part in most visitor attractions’ strategies.


PROLOGIC FIRST UK LTD Andy Povey, general manager


W


e supply ticketing systems for sev- eral companies


that work together. We have the technology to operate multiple tickets from multiple locations and sell tickets for multi- ple attractions from a single website. We see this as a particularly valuable mar-


ANDY POVEY


keting tool for attractions owners. If a family books a ticket for one attraction, they may be tempted to book for another attraction simul- taneously. Even if not, the process may bring other attractions to their notice and increase the possibility of them visiting in the future. We’re happy to work with other ticketing system suppliers and are confi dent that data


76 Attractions Handbook 2011-2012


can be moved between the different opera- tors, given willingness on all sides. But again, I suspect that the biggest suppliers are likely to be the slowest to understand the dynamics of destination marketing and accept its value to their customers. You also have the odd situation in the ticketing market where some suppliers regard information about customers as belonging to them. The diffi cult part is get- ting ticketing system vendors to understand that they don’t own their customers. If the customer wants to have collaborative market- ing, the vendors should be able to provide it. Our view is that the person who buys a ticket is the attraction’s customer and therefore the data belong to the attraction. People are constantly surprised that they don’t have to pay to get their data from us. The biggest challenge in establishing multi-


ple ticketing systems is changing the culture in the market. The problem is that operators aren’t sure of what they can get because


they’ve become used to the current relation- ship between suppliers and customers. Once they understand there are alternatives, the market will start to change. Operators stand to benefi t from a massively


increased marketing presence. Leafl ets for all the local attractions are already displayed in tourist information offi ces. We’re talking about going a step further to give people the ability to book several attractions at once. Far East conference destinations recognised the value of collaborative marketing years ago, know- ing that if conference organisers chose to go to Hong Kong one year, they might choose Singapore the next. It’s all about competing locally and collaborating globally. Ticketing for individual sites will probably


remain the main way of operating for some time but once attractions owners realise there’s a potential new market through collaborative or destination marketing, the popularity of that will grow.


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