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TICKETING


OMNITICKET NETWORK John Davies, director of UK operations


implement their unique marketing initiatives, in- cluding possible joint/ multiple ticket offers with other attractions and destination packages. Ticketing suppli- ers can keep and win attractions clients by offering solutions that allow the attractions to successfully implement and manage all of their marketing initiatives. There are technical and operational chal-


E JOHN DAVIES


lenges to effectively offering a joint/multiple ticket, as well as the challenge of creating a win-win business model for all the involved attractions and suppliers. Technically, you need systems that are advanced enough to offer real-time, standard interfaces between the systems. Operationally, you need to make sure all related staff at each attraction are trained on the product offer- ings and aware of any special procedures required in relation to the joint ticket. And each party involved must be able to offer or support the joint ticket offering at a profi t. This challenge often involves creative pricing models and effective negotiating amongst the parties. How the profi ts are split is an important


question that usually takes a bit of nego- tiation between the parties. The revenue earned from the sale of joint tickets can be split based on several factors – fi rstly, where the ticket is sold or by whom. Some- times the party selling the ticket gets more of the revenue split. Sometimes each


74 Attractions Handbook 2011-2012


very attraction and venue needs the flexibility to


party gets a fi xed amount no matter who is actually selling the ticket. Many times, if a ticket is sold through a particular sales channel, such as a distributor’s website, the revenue share will include a portion for the sales channel as well. The second factor is where the ticket is used. Often the attractions get more revenue if the ticket is used at their venue. For example, a ticket may be valid for use at three venues, but the consumer only manages to visit two of the three sites. In this case, the venues that the consumer visited may get more of the revenue share. Other times the venues do not consider visitation at all. Thirdly, other factors in the revenue split


include how much the standard admission is for each venue. For example, the stand- ard admission price at a museum may be US$10 and the standard admission price at a theme park may be US$60. If the two venues wanted to offer a joint ticket, the attraction with the higher value standard admission would ask to receive a larger portion of the joint ticket revenue. While each attraction’s ticketing strategy


will continue to strongly focus on their unique brand and individual products and ticket offerings, many attractions actively inves- tigate ways to increase overall sales by working with partners to offer packages or joint tickets. They also realise that pro- moting their destination increases the number of visitors coming into their market. As a sup- plier, we feel that the technology behind our destination marketing programme is crucial to fully support our attraction client’s diverse distribution requirements.


There are technical and operational challenges to offering a joint or multiple ticket


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