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LIVE MUSIC


Heidepark in Germany is also gearing up for a concert in August, co-hosted with the coun- try’s biggest radio channel, and Gardaland in Italy has already hosted P!NK. Alton Towers is running two more events this summer: Alton Towers Live headlined by JLS and a month later by the Black Eyed Peas. “For Alton Towers Live we wanted to cre-


ate a summer event under an umbrella name which we can run for years to come,” says Sidley. “The plan is to showcase the young acts: headline with a band who has a good following and then have supporting bands who are up and coming. We approached the Black Eyed Peas, as they are one of the hottest tickets at the moment.”


CREATING A FESTIVAL Norwegian family theme park Kongeparken is now host to the country’s fi fth biggest an- nual music festival – Landstreff. This event, which attracts 11,000 teenagers each year, has evolved from the national school leavers’ festival. “When we acquired the park in 1997,


SOME WORDS OF ADVICE ■ There are daily tasks involved, so someone needs to have designated responsibility. ■ Take a music promotion qualifi cation to gear you up for the planning and management. ■ Get the line-up right: consider your space, which artists are current, could fi ll that capacity and be appealing to your audience. ■ Hire professionals to negotiate with the artists and get in with the relevant promoters. ■ Don’t skimp on the sound and lighting Make friends with your neighbours. Work with the emergency services.


64 Attractions Handbook 2011-2012


P!NK's concert at Alton Towers theme park was a huge commercial success


we inherited a youth festival, so we came up with the idea of making it a seniors event,” says park director Håkon Lund. “They arrive on Friday and have the park to themselves for three days. The tickets sell out a year in ad- vance, before the bands are even announced. We could easily sell twice as many, but we limit the capacity for safety’s sake.” This point is echoed by Sidley – although


Alton Towers could accommodate more guests, they keep the numbers at a level which guarantees a good experience, rather than risking the brand by overselling. The core audience of the Landstreff is


older than the usual target group of 0-14-year- olds, so Kongeparken keeps the two brands separate. The attraction lends itself well to a festival, with six stage venues, including a 15,000-capacity natural outdoor amphitheatre and an indoor one with a retractable roof. More than 30 bands play through the week- end, both big Norwegian bands and others from the US, such as Busta Rhymes. “We could make more money if we had less bands, but we want the entertainment


We keep the numbers at a level which guarantees a good experience,


rather than risking the brand by overselling


to be the main focus, rather than alcohol,” says Lund. “We want to keep the guests as sober as possible, to avoid any problems which could lead to negative publicity for the park.” Despite the cost of running the event, Lund


says it is a good commercial operation: “One of the benefi ts is that selling the tickets in advance gives the park liquidity during the months when it’s not open.”


THE LOGISTICS Kongeparken and Alton Towers are both closed to non-ticket holders when an event is taking place, but this doesn’t have to be the case, as Eden proves. Day visitors can come


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