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attractions management handbook 2011–2012


Latest developments p8


Operators weather 2010 p30


5 WELCOME The attractions industry continues to innovate says Liz Terry.


6 CONTENTS


8 DEVELOPMENT PIPELINE A breakdown of planned attractions developments by market sector.


analysis and trends


30 ThE PErfOrMaNCE rOLLErCOaSTEr The TEA/AECOM Theme Index reveals that pressures on attractions operators resulted in mixed results across the globe in 2010, according to David Camp.


6 Attractions Handbook 2011–2012


The latest cultural projects p56


34 aTTraCTIONS INVESTMENT BrIEfING Nigel Bland of Deloitte looks at how attractions operators have boosted revenues and acquired new sites in spite of the recession.


38 IS PaST PErfOrMaNCE rELEVaNT? Lesley Morisetti, AECOM, and Alan Love, BDRC, brief us on two key benchmarking projects undertaken for the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions (ALVA).


42 POLITICS ON ThE MENU Rikka Johnson, manager of the renowned The Source restaurant at The Newseum, gives us the low down on how to go about hosting VIP guests like President Obama.


The president comes to lunch p42


46 INDIa rIPE fOr GrOWTh Jennifer Harbottle asks the experts how the relatively untapped but potentially lucrative attractions industry in India can move forward.


50 PLaNET MYThOLOGY Vice president of BRC Imagination Arts, Christian Lachel, discusses the importance of conservation and sustainability in shaping the attractions sector.


56 CULTUrE ShOCK A round up of some of the most exciting and iconic museums, art galleries and music venues being built worldwide in 2010-11.


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