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SUSTAINABILITY


difference in the world. There's also a growing trend in new theme park developments for a more sustainable approach right from the start. Disneyland Shanghai has stated that sustainability and nature will be woven into the fabric of the park. The recently announced Hello Kitty park nestled in one of the greenest regions of China will embrace sustainable design and the natural environment. But, these trends are not new for many zoos


and aquariums. They continue to lead the way in conservation and sustainable design. Inherently, planet mythology is central to their mission and theme development. However, we're seeing more people interested in these stories and a growing trend for sharing this with visitors. New shows like One Ocean at Seaworld bring to light the importance of our interconnected world and the deep planet mythology binding us together. Museums, science and nature centres also


lead the way with new sustainable projects opening globally. From epic green museum structures, green exhibition techniques and new nature visitor centres highlighting our world in compelling ways. The Smart Home: Green + Wired at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago, US, is just one example of this growing trend. People of all ages are engaging in the planet mythology narrative and learning about new scientifi c fi ndings to help make a difference. Even technology is shifting to help tell the


planet story. New technologies like iCloud streaming data systems from Apple, mobile tablets, devices and apps, Skype and other ICT systems are helping to reduce our need to travel and are increasing our ability to share information quickly. These systems are incredibly useful in attractions, allowing for real-time monitoring of show systems, updating content easily and also shrinking the number of hardware components needed. There is also an increase in the LED lighting


54 Attractions Handbook 2011-2012


change are all around us. People are hungry for a new mythology and hungry for new experiences that reaffi rm the planet story. Ten years ago the resource guide for green attractions would have fi tted onto a single page. Today there are numerous resources, initiatives and projects happening. In fact, too many to put in a single article. It’s hard to ignore the importance of this


New technologies help tell the planet story


The resource guide for green initiatives and projects in the attractions sector continues to grow


solutions available and many hardware companies understand that their products need to fi t into a larger sustainable attraction or building system. For example, Christie Digital has a well-established environmental leadership programme and their latest projec- tion systems reduce the amount of energy required. These initiatives earned them the inaugural InfoComm Green AV in 2010. The story has shifted and the signals that things are changing and will continue to


new planet mythology in the wake of recent environmental and natural disasters around the globe. Joseph Campbell made his predic- tion about the new, emerging myth 24 years ago. The 'canary in the coal mine' -- the fi rst harbinger of change -- is often the stories that breakthrough in popular culture. Avatar’s astonishing popularity revealed the deep, emotional need people around the world have to experience and share this mythic bit of popular storytelling. Those who want to continue with 'business as usual' are fi ghting this trend, and the ferocity of the struggle reveals how quickly and deeply the new myth is embedding itself in what Jung called the ‘collective unconscious‘ of humanity. “And in the end, the love you take is equal to the love you make.” The Beatles. Christian Lachel is vice president at


BRC Imaginations Arts, one of the world's leading experiential design studios creating world-class attractions and destinations for a diverse range of clients, ranging from en- tertainment attractions, major brands visitor centres, corporations, world expo pavilions, museums, cultural, nature and heritage at- tractions, government agencies and global tourist destinations. An industry leader in integrating sustainable principles in all man- ner of design and production, Christian is a member of the US Green Building Council, a LEED-accredited professional and a former board member of the Society of Environmen- tal & Graphic Design. He graduated from the Art Center College of Design in California.


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