This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
susTAinAbiliTy


friendly and sustainable; that’s just part of doing modern business. These eco-trends that have accelerated over the last 10 years will continue to shape the experiences we create and the stories we tell well into the future. This year Disney’s new Aulani Resort will open in Hawaii – the first family resort not linked to a Disney theme park. The resort highlights Hawaiian history with a balance between nature and spirit (planet mythol- ogy). Sustainability and conservation will also feature throughout, from the stories told to the finely detailed spaces, nature-inspired activi- ties and supporting local culture and farming. Disney is making a bold move into a new terri- tory embracing eco-tourism, storytelling and adventure, with a family-friendly approach. Other eco-toursim trends include coun-


trywide branding and experience creation. For example, New Zealand has deeply rooted their 100 per cent Pure You tourism initiative highlighting the experience of nature and culture. The country has created a rich tourism offering, complete with countrywide i-Site visitor centres and a 100 per cent Pure Assurance quality standards – a bold commitment to their visitors. Costa Rica has followed suit, rebranding their country's tour-


Planet mythology is finding its way into new theme parks, attractions and global events. Nature and sustainability themed heavily in the Floriade 2012 world horticultural expo in Venlo, the Netherlands


Theme and waterparks are undergoing sustainable changes, with existing operators incorporating innovative solutions to reduce their carbon footprint


ism brand to 'No Artificial Ingredients' in order to highlight their commitment to eco-tourism initiatives and activities. In their words, “21st century tourism must be sustainable or it will not survive”. To this end they have created the CST: Certification for Sustainable Tourism, re- sulting in a steady tourism growth curve with two million visitors in 2010 and contributing around 7.2 per cent to the country's GDP. Planet mythology is also finding its way


into newly planned theme parks, attractions and global events. In 2000, BIE (Bureau of International Expositions) supported a series of eco-focused world expositions. The Han- nover Expo in 2000 inspired the Hannover Principles written by Michael Braungart and William McDonough, a key white paper which has since expanded to form the Cradle to Cradle (C2C) protocol now reshaping the way we make things. This year the Cradle to


Cradle Products Innovation Institute opened in San Francisco, US, to support companies and countries worldwide to create a sustain- able economy. At Expo 2005, the theme was Aichi Nature’s Wisdom, highlighting the new planet mythology in a variety of ways ranging from future mobility robots to new building practices like organic plastic structures and fuel cell and renewable energy systems. One of the greenest events in history, the project still has lasting innovation legacies that are being implemented around the world. Last year, Expo 2010 Shanghai focused


on Better Cities, Better Life. Over 73 million visitors were entertained and inspired by in- novative ideas on how to create better urban environments and improve quality of life. The Urban Best Practice area presented concrete examples of how cities worldwide are reshap- ing their urban environments to promote


52 Attractions Handbook 2011-2012


www.attractionshandbook.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176