This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
round so the sun was in a good spot to hide as much shadow as possible and started shooting. I have to admit I was quite impressed with the results of my makeshift studio.


A few teething troubles presented themselves – my head was casting a nasty shadow over Barry’s feet and one side of his head was being cast into darkness. To solve this I decided to make myself a home-made reflector out of a plastic lid and some tin foil. I then set my camera to self-timer, set up the shot and then stood to one side of Barry using my newly-acquired tool to direct some light onto Barry’s face. The result was pretty good – Barry looked properly gorgeous, his shadowy side was


more evenly lit and even threw a little catch-light sparkle in his eyes!


So – my little experiment in photography may be ever so slightly daft but it highlights a few more key factors to good photos. One is that it is important to use a tripod or, at the very least, plonk your camera on a non-moving surface. The less light there is, the slower the shutter speed will be on your camera (particularly if you are using a camera which relies on automatic settings) and the more prone your images will be to blur caused by a wobbly photographer. If you use a tripod, or rest the camera on a stable surface, you eliminate the potential for this to occur. Also, using a camera remote, or even the self-timer, means you won’t suffer from any camera shake as the photo is taken.


Another is the importance of choosing a good background for your shot. I used a piece of plain white paper, which worked very well, but equally you could go for something


87 | ukhandmade | Summer 2011


more fitting to the style of your shop/website. Bright colours work well, even some pattern (perhaps a wood grain) – but whatever you use, make sure it doesn’t detract from the product. Make sure you clear any irrelevant “clutter” from the background – there is nothing worse than seeing junk in a shot – it looks amateurish!


My garden chair studio also emphasises the importance of controlling the light. Making sure the direction the light is coming from works well with your composition, ensuring that the whole image is exposed properly (remember I did this with tin foil – a great tool for reflecting light!).


Different products will favour different lighting and techniques and the harsh bright sun might not work with smaller, more delicate products. So - bring it inside! A conservatory for example has a fantastic roof on it – designed to diffuse sunlight and create even lighting, rather like the


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94