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FOCUS: Photography Master Class - See


the Light! by Luke Yates of Way Ahead Photography


Dare I employ the age-old cliché at the beginning of an article written about product photography? Well, yes actually, “A picture speaks a thousand words” - or so they say... right?


According to various sources on the internet, a staggering 83% of users will skip Ebay listings that don’t have a photo, whilst there are 24% more visits to Ebay sites that have a gallery and vendors can expect significant 11% more visits to pages that have “super-size” images.


(higher resolution)


Conclusion: in the faceless, anonymous internet market, shoppers want to see exactly what they are getting for their cash. So what can you, the seller, do about this? Does this mean you need to


85 | ukhandmade | Summer 2011


go out and invest money in the latest DSLR, the high-end lighting, perhaps even a studio? Fortunately, no you don’t!


One of the popular misconceptions about photography (especially in the realms of camera clubs) is that better equipment equals better photographs; Wrong! Tools are only useful in the hands of somebody who knows how to use them and a tool is, after all, just a device to make a job easier. Anyone who has ever wired an electric plug using a butter knife will know exactly what I mean (Ed: don’t try that at home).


Whilst you may need to get more innovative, it is perfectly possible to create professional-looking product photos (as well as other sorts of photos) with a basic digital camera


and a bit of creativity, providing you are aware of the elements that make photography possible.


The word “photograph” means


“drawing with light” - so I would suggest that light is what photography is all about. Based on this, getting the light right for your photos is probably the most important factor and the one that will make the most difference in how your photos turn out. With a relatively


inexpensive and mainly


automatic compact camera it’s very simple – basically the more light available, the sharper, clearer and better the photo.


Firstly and most importantly, let’s get rid of something that will hinder and generally mess up your photos. You know that built-in flash that you


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