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the arms and legs were too fiddly to stuff!


Do you think there’s more value in selling a kit rather than a finished object? I think we’ve entered into a ‘make do and mend’ culture, lots of young women are exploring sewing skills they didn’t know they had and are really enjoying it. Women (and grandmothers) enjoy making gifts for their children and the fact that they’ve made them makes them more special.


I’m completely self-taught as my background was initially in music before taking the plunge to change my career! I’ve always loved Scandinavian design; I’ve visited Sweden, Denmark and Finland and particularly love the 50s ceramics from these countries. My parents liked Scandinavian design so their taste must have been an influence in my work.


Your kit is multi-functional, it can be sewn up into a doll or used as


73 | ukhandmade | Summer 2011


a tea towel. Where did this idea come from? I felt it was nice for people to have the option to keep it as a tea towel if they wanted as many of these are bought as gifts. The challenge was that the design had to look good and interesting on the tea towel held vertically. The image is placed so when it’s hanging on its hook, it still looks ok. I tested the kit out amongst friends and children and also my three year old daughter. I tried making a smaller doll kit but


I’ve sold far more kits than dolls and it’s lovely to hear from customers saying they’re looking forward to making them. It’s also a way of passing down sewing skills from one generation to another - my daughter can’t wait to start sewing and making cushions!


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