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Firstly, it seems obvious but it had to be simple. I wanted a product that could be built by young folk, parents or grandparents. Another consideration was price. I needed it to be inexpensive so that it could be bought in bulk for youth groups, forestry areas, or large gardens.


For people who’ve never heard of Wudwerx, tell us a little bit about yourself and what you make? I make a range of wooden products to bring life to your home and garden. My main ranges are wildlife habitats for everything from Bees to Birds. I started by making bird boxes for my parent’s garden they needed several and suggested I make a few extra to sell. The rest, as they say is history.


You’ve obviously had success selling bird boxes, why did you


72 | ukhandmade | Summer 2011


want to sell them as kits? I started making kits so that I could give other people the chance to work with wood. There are many people out there who want to make but who don’t have the saws/drills etc. needed to make them from scratch. The kits give people the chance to build a solid bird box with nothing more than a screwdriver and a hammer.


What were the challenges of designing a kit that would be suitable for everyone?


Finally, I wanted it to be recognisable, so the finished product is the traditional bird box you may see on any walk in the woods. I tested the design many times to make sure it works as it should. I ran the instructions past several people to ensure they made sense and could easily be followed. Finally, the box itself is a design that works! We have blue tits nesting in a box in our back garden that is this design.


Jane, for people who’ve never seen your work please tell us how you came to crafting? I live in Devon and run a small business called ‘Jane Foster Designs’ from my studio; I screen print and make items from vintage fabrics.


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