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country estate, a school veg plot or a natural woodland” because they believe that, “interacting with living plants and animals provides a very rich, hands-on learning experience in which both formal and informal education can flourish”.


A great one for the kids is Deen City Farm, a registered charity in South West London which has changed a disused, weed ridden part of its site on Morden Hall Park Estate (National Trust land) into an interactive, colourful vegetable and flower growing area with a special turf maze!


The garden attracts


people of all ages and successfully runs


volunteer placements;


Green Fingers Educational Tours which allow children to experience the garden first hand; The Growing Links project which allows individuals a section of the garden to grow what they want and Environmental Workshops.


Community gardens are by no means confined to inner cities.


48 | ukhandmade | Summer 2011


Grace and Flavour, a community vegetable growing co-operative, set up in a derelict walled garden on a National Trust property, based in West Horsley in Surrey, is a prime example of what can be achieved in terms of growing output by such projects.


The co-operative grows food for people living and working in the surrounding areas with crops going to co-op members and local retailers with 10% set aside for free distribution


to those in the


community who have no access to fresh, locally grown produce. In its first year the co-operative produced: 103K of carrots, 401 cucumbers, 161 peppers, 195K of runner beans and generated approximately £2300 from crop sales; impressive indeed!


It’s easy to see the attraction of such projects. Abi Mordin is Project Co-ordinator at Urban Roots, a community led organisation in Toryglen, Glasgow, committed to working with local people on projects


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