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LIFESTYLE: Community Gardening by Anna Stassen of Sakura Jewellery


The UK has relied on community gardens to provide food for hundreds of years; during the Second World War, for example, people were urged to ‘dig for victory’ with community allotments being setup to provide local people with much needed fruit and vegetables.


More recently there has been a surge in demand for communal plots of land thanks to the current trend towards sustainability and eco-aware consumer habits. More people are looking to ‘grow their own’ and ensure that the food they eat and feed to their children is free of harmful chemicals, grown organically and produced ethically.


Community gardens come in many different shapes and sizes. 47 | ukhandmade | Summer 2011


The Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens, the national face of the community farm and garden movement in the UK, describes them as, “community- managed projects working with people, animals and plants ranging from tiny wildlife gardens to fruit and vegetable plots on housing estates, from community polytunnels to large city farms”.


Schools are getting in on the act with the assistance of organisations such as Growing Schools, a partnership, funded by the Department for Education and managed on a day-to-day basis by Farming and Countryside Education (FACE). Growing


Schools gives children


“the opportunity to connect with the living environment, whether it is an inner city window box or a vast


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