This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
BUSINESS: Discover Your Personal


Brand and Message by Julia Pitkin of www.artisans-in-the-hills.co.uk


done from internet cafe and mobile. Her friends now know her for having fun, getting things done and her sociability. Within months Beth has created her personal brand at school and has a following of 350 friends on Facebook.


Beth is my 13½ year old daughter; she is daily creating a personal brand. Having moved to the area and a new school 18 months ago, Beth knew nobody. She worked hard finding a group of friends and positioning herself amongst them.


Recently, Beth arranged a cinema trip whilst away on holiday; contacting her new friends, deciding on the film, pickups and cost. This was all


44 | ukhandmade | Summer 2011


Beth’s core needs that drove her behaviour are to belong and have companionship. Beth’s approach to the world is open, random and supportive. She calls it ‘being cool’, and ‘getting street cred.’ My business terms are ‘building brand equity’ and ‘social capital.’


We all have a brand within, know what it is, develop it and let it out.


A brand should capture attention, evoke an emotion and be memorable. Artists and Makers


are well equipped to meet all three elements.


Your personal brand


should communicate something unique about your work, about you, so that potential buyers learn to recognize your style and associate with it a delightful experience.


Step 1: Engage with your core needs and drivers.


As makers, our need for creativity is very much part of our well-being, so we often immerse ourselves into our work losing track of time. Tap into what drives your creativity, shape your experience into words and express them in your Maker’s Statement.


The statement is one of your best opportunities to engage your viewer with your work. Here are the core


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