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The Savannah Signal Final Issue 2011


www.savannahcatclub.com


Lighting


Besides being too dark, have you even noticed that sometimes pictures have a yellow cast to them or the colors seem washed out? This is due to poor lighting. And what can we do to avoid the green laser orb eyes?


1. Natural Light - The BEST lighting for taking pictures of cats is outdoors on a bright, but overcast day, or, if it‘s a sunny day, have the cat in bright yet shaded location.


2. Artificial light – Considering we all don‘t have a secure outdoor location and weather doesn‘t always cooperate, the next best option is a well lit room. Use as much natural light as possible by opening curtains and blinds, and then supplement with artificial lights.


True light or Daylight bulbs – these are your best first choice for artificial lighting. They cast as a l ight that is very close to full spectrum daylight. They may cost a few cents more, but the results of using daylight bulbs is well worth it.


Halogen bulbs produce a very bright, yellow/white light. Better than incandescent or fluorescent alone.


Incandescent bulbs generate a yellow spectrum light and it yellows the subject and background in photos.


Fluorescent bulbs produce blue spectrum light which can make everything seem dull and washed out.


3. Flash – Avoid using the flash for lighting whenever possible. Not only does it tend to reflect back and can wash out the color, but when your cat looks directly at the source of the flash, you end with alien "laser" eyes.


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If you need to use the flash, here is a tip I read online: Try covering your camera's flash assembly with a bit of opaque tissue paper. Tear or cut a small piece and tape it over the camera's flash as- sembly. This will help to diffuse the light and lessen the "laser beam" effect.


Also, at professional photo shoots, I quickly learned that a clicker, feathers and other toys can be very useful tools. The idea is to distract the cat so they look away from the flash and their eyes are not directly focused on the camera. Get the cat's attention by pulling the toy toward the camera, moving it behind and out of the frame. Of course this takes practice and patience and it might help to have someone assisting you too!


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