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A T HLE T IC S


Mountain Bike Clinic for Ski Camp Attendees; Nationals on the Horizon


with the Ski Committee and is hosting a mountain bike camp in conjunction with the August ski camp. Helping Coach Jacobsen are MAC member Chuck DeVoe and Coaches Mike Sheppard and Shari White. The coaches lead rides over four days – Tuesday, Aug. 2 through Friday, Aug. 5. Coach Jacobsen joined Multnomah Athletic Club earlier this year to help develop MAC riders under the age of 20. The newly formed Junior Cycling Program is tailored to meet the needs of junior cyclists at MAC. From group rides, to racing, to introductions to different types of cycling (road, track, mountain, cyclo- cross), the program aims to meet the needs and interests of developing junior cyclists in any discipline. Custom-tailored training programs are available. Join the group for weekly rides. See the MAC website or contact Coach Jacobsen at bjacobsen@ gmail.com for more information.


C


2011 U.S. Cycling National Championships


The U.S. Masters National Cycling Championships are held every year for athletes age 30 and older. The venue changes every two years among the east, central and western regions of the U.S. The championships were held in Louisville, Ky. for the past two years. In 2011 and 2012 the Championships are hosted by Bend. The 2011 event is Aug. 30 to Sept. 3.


The championships consist of races in three disciplines: road, time trial and criterium. Races are held for each age and gender group. Masters categories start at age 30 and increase in five-year incre- ments, i.e. 30-34; 35-39; 40-44, etc. Racers must only compete in their own age and gender group.


The road race is a mass start event where the first rider across the line at the end of the race wins and earns the right to wear the national champion’s jersey for the next year. Riders use different tactics to take advantage of their own strengths


Popular second Saturday rides are open to members and guests.


and to guard against their weaknesses. The strongest riders attack so they can drop the other racers and ride to the finish alone. Riders with good speed conserve their strength and wait until the end of the race and sprint across the line first. The length of each race is shorter as


the racer’s age increases. At press time, the length of each race and the exact course has not been announced. We can assume the race course will have a mix of hills and flat sections that will allow riders of all types to have a good race.


A time trial is an event where each rider is individually timed and starts at 30-second or one-minute intervals. Drafting is not allowed, so each rider must gauge his or her effort to ride as fast as possible for the entire course. Generally, riders from age 30 through 64 race about 25 miles, while riders 65 and older race about 12 miles. The exact champion- ship course and distances have not been announced yet. Since this is an individual


race without drafting, it is an excellent race for those who are not comfortable racing in a group. These races favor strong riders who can sustain a high pace for the whole race. This is also a wonderful event for Triathletes since it is just like the cycling portion of their event, but without the swim or running to tire them out. The criterium is a fast and exciting race held on a short course with four or more 90 degree turns per lap. Racers ride for either a set number of laps or a set time plus five laps. These races normally last 30 minutes to one hour and are both fun to race and to watch. These races are well suited to competitors with good bike handling skills and the ability to recover from multiple short efforts. Riders at the back of the field must slow down for each corner and then accelerate to catch the field again. Riders at the front of the pack are able to ride at their own speed through the corners and keep a steadier pace.


continued on page 50 AUGUST 2011 | The Wınged M | 49


ycling’s newest Member Coach, Benjamin Jacobsen, has coordinated


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