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STARTUP COMPANY PROFILES


2011 ANNUAL REPORT / TECHNOLOGY VENTURE DEVELOPMENT


26


KNUDRA BIOSENSOR KITS AND ASSAYS


Founded: 2009 Originating Department: Biology Industry: Pharmaceuticals Inventor: Erik Jorgensen Website: www.knudra.com/knudra/about/


Toxins in our food, medicines and


environment are a growing problem. The National Toxicology Program of the Department of Health and Human Services estimates 100,000 compounds need toxicity testing. In vitro diagnostics is a growing market sector replacing traditional toxicology screening in animals. An alternative approach is the use the


simple model organism, the nematode C.


elegans. Knudra builds genetically engineered nematode worms to act as biosensors of toxicity. These transgenic worms are tools to uncover toxic liabilities in three areas: (1) drug development and manufacturing, (2) industrial toxicology contaminant detection, and (3) food-additives technology.


PREDICTIVE MEDICAL BETTER INFORMATION, BETTER ALERTING,


BETTER DECISIONS


Founded: 2010 Industry: Health care Inventor: Ute Gawlick Website: www.predictivemedical.com


Predictive Medical has created an electronic ICU surveillance platform and has five diagnostic tests in its development pipeline. All five of the tests are for use in the hospital critical care environment. Each test can predict the 24-hour likelihood of a particular adverse outcome. The five diagnostic tests


are cardiopulmonary arrest, respiratory failure, renal failure, sepsis and re-intubation risk. These diagnostics are software algorithms designed to operate on patient data already collected by the hospital EMR and patient monitoring systems. There is no new “device” required to run these tests and there is no new sampling required. Diagnostics take only seconds to run and, in practice, are run continuously, automatically alerting the clinicians when there are positive results.


PERFECT VISION LENS TO CURE GLARE AND REFRACTIVE ERROR


AFTER CATARACT SURGERY Founded: 2010


Founded: 2010 Originating Department: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences Industry: Ophthalmology Inventor: Randall J Olson, M.D.


Three million Americans a year have cataract surgery. While very successful, 10 percent complain of glare related to the new intraocular lens that has been placed in their eye as part of this procedure, and up to 10 percent would like a better refractive result (better vision without needing glasses). This is


especially true for those who have previously had refractive surgery like LASIK, PRK and RK because our ability to predict the correct lens power is limited in such cases. The invention is a low-profile intraocular lens that can be placed in the eye after cataract surgery for the correction of all refractive error and disabling glare. The surgery can use the original incision and would take a matter of minutes. Refractive accuracy would be very precise and the new lens is easily replaced at any time if the eye changes in its refractive needs. It could also be used to create multifocality (see far and near without other correction).


Originating Department: Electrical Engineering Industry: Automotive


Inventors: Justin Ferguson, Chad Mann, Jordan Nicholls, Chase Thompson


Website: www.shortsolutionsengineering.com


Winner of the 2009 Utah Entrepreneur Challenge, Short Solutions is


based on diagnostics to identify intermittent and permanent electrical faults in automobiles, which are notoriously difficult to detect and repair. Intermittent faults can only be identified while the malfunction is occurring. Short Solutions utilizes SmartFuse, a device that can detect intermittent faults while


the automobile is on and can record the time, location and type of fault as the automobile is driven. SmartFuse utilizes spread- spectrum time-domain reflectometry (SSTDR), which sends an electrical signal through a wire and compares the readings to a baseline, “healthy” measurement.


SHORT SOLUTIONS DETECTING INTERMITTENT FAULTS IN AUTOMOBILES


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