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Brenda Hillman refers of Moore’s spoken word/printed matter poetry as ‘imploring the performative aspects of verbal everyday use of language.’ This ensures a mode of writing which visualises utterance and steps beyond the need for established rules associated with a prose use of ritualistic pathway delimiters––––Inventory—B.¶ A more contemporary development of this mode of writing is seen rendered more vividly in tachygraphic writing––––a mode of writing extended by typographic marks.


Seen as extending the act of visible and visual writing, tachygraphic writing corrupts use ritualistic markers more acutely———modifying a reader’s expectations in equal measure. The result unifies inventories A and B and silences lexical load. Pfhemmmmmmmmm… a new form of ritualistic utterance bursts through as a decorative


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† (dagger symbol) A typographic prompt as the aforementioned asterisk is also. Usually shown smaller—as is any glyph used to indicate a footnote—and suspended beside a chosen word. Ritualistically used inline in a text to guide a reader’s attention to look towards the bottom of a page or at the end of a prose section for extra information or detail. This can be about something or someone‡ or elaboration on a point of interest.


‡ (double dagger symbol) Use is identical to asterisk and dagger symbols although indicates the third footnote––––––dagger symbol indicates second footnote––––––asterisk indicates initial footnote item. Use of the second footnote glyph comes is burdened with mysticism: the symbol can be found etched beside the names of the deceased on Christian grave headstones, and it is advised to avoid placing it next to the name of a living person. As if to avoid the token possession associated with the mysteries about talismans MATER·MEMENTO·MORI·MORS·ULTIMA·LINEA·RERUM·EST


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