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The Victorian English Gentlemens Club show no hint of Victoriana, nor exclusivity, and comprise of only two thirds men, gentle or otherwise. I’m looking for entertaining, chappish, Victorian clichés: moustaches, monocles, morality and so forth, but am met with weary derision. “Yes and no, mainly no. To tell you truth I get bored and mildly irritated with the imagery connotations. John Lennon didn’t push a dung ball around the stage. Mick Jagger wasn’t a boulder.” Placing oneself in such company is a self-assured start from founder member Adam Taylor. Knowing that the other original member of the band is one Louise Mason, I ask about the entry policy for women to the Gentlemens Club. “What…in the band? Well Louise formed the band with me back at art school so, er, yes. Only to keep in line with new government guidelines on equality of course.” Once again I have stumbled into saying something unbelievably irksome and tedious. “I don’t like cock rock, jackoff wig-outs, or on stage masturbation. Girls I get on with aren’t really into that. We meet loads of math rock bands, aiming to ignite the parts of the male brain that drools at car metal and gadgets via clever time signatures and muscle. I find that tiresome.” Ah. On other matters he becomes more enthused, “A lot of the bands Louise and I were influenced by when we formed have girls as key members. Not necessarily doing lead vocals, more providing instrumental and vocal backing rhythms. Velvet Underground, Sonic Youth, Pixies, White Stripes, Talking Heads.”


So I should just move on from the band name,


right? “We wanted the longest stupidest name we could get away with. We heard the name The Victorian English Gentlemens Club called out as the winners of a pub quiz. So we took it. Maybe it was against the Nathan Barley, monosyllabic, shoe shop band names. I don’t know. It’s daft. I like it.” I think about raising the missing apostrophe, but think better of it. As well as a dislike of cock rock, Nathan Barley band names, Victorian imagery and my bad jokes, Adam relishes “a fight”, argues “a lot”. Whilst in certain respects, their music owes something to the classic 3 minute pop song, it is undeniably dark. Gloomy dissonance in places tips over into outright menace. “There’s a lot of space in our music, maybe due to being a 3 piece. It adds unease and tension. Or perhaps we are parent hating emos, hiding behind our hair because we don’t want a job. I don’t like easy


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