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I meet Ali Love at his new East London flat, where he excitedly gives me the full guided tour. From the contents of the fridge to what the builders have been doing in the bathroom. He is an extremely candid and unguarded interviewee. “I don’t care,” he says. “I’m totally open to all talking aspects.”


Ali’s musical career began in 2006 with the single K-hole; a mad, loud, pop-punk narration of a night of gradual and utter dissolution. The singles he released on his own label, I Love Records, were followed by collaboration with Chemical Brothers on the sparse and pounding, Do It Again, and a record deal with Columbia, which saw his music shift Popwards. “Embarrassing bullshit really,” he calls it, “I did a load of bullshit. Just kind of going along with it. Not really paying much attention.” The relationship didn’t last long. In 2008, he parted with the label. “That went tits up.” Why? “I wasn’t really ready. I wasn’t really into being made into some kind of Pop Star. It just didn’t sit with me at all.” I mention how often his music videos exploit his heart throb good looks. “Yeah it’s bullshit man. I did a load of bullshit. I wasn’t really into that whole thing. I didn’t really feel comfortable with it. I feel comfortable more being behind the scenes. In the underground. Doing it for the love. Instead of being like [puts on goofy voice] ‘Hey everyone, look at me’. But it looks like he’s enjoying himself now. “I like that people play my music around the world. That’s a good feeling. People everywhere, dancing to what you’ve done. That’s a good thing you know. Inspiring. Making you feel enthusiastic. Like you can do more stuff. And you think, ‘This is cool’. It makes you feel as though you have something to give.” With his Poppiest work now behind him, he


is best known for his disco-centred, electronic dance music. “I’ve made a lot of different types of music in the last, I don’t know, 5 years or something. Quite a lot of electro. Funk. Quite a lot of house music. Some kind of punk stuff. Some new wave stuff. Alt country songs. I’ve done lots of various mercenary work, with other producers and people. Some very successful and some, you know, very underground. Of a certain genre, or of a certain…tribe. The last record I did was quite disco influenced. Arpeggiated, electronic disco. But I wouldn’t say that is ‘What. I. Do.’ I just happened to get into a certain style. And happened to get obsessed with it. And made a record like that. But really my main objective


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