This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Alexis


HOT GENRE: Europop


and the world over in the late ‘70s. ABBA was among the earliest Europop groups to gain worldwide fame. The late ‘80s and early ‘90s also brought about a renewed interest in Europop with groups like Roxette and Ace of Base. In 2011, Europop artists such as


T


Lady Gaga and Florence & The Machine are tearing up charts. Even bands that aren’t specifically Europop, like Yeasayer


he infectious dance beats and syn- thesized melodies of Europop first started spreading across Europe


PHOTO: ANTHONY NOWACK


and Broken Social Scene, include ele- ments of it. Europop is also growing on a local


level. In West Michigan, bands such as Tokyo Morose and Stepdad use synthe- sizers and electro-drum beats to concoct a sound that certainly has Euro-influence. But the area’s most overtly Europop band is Alexis, based out of Sparta. Matthew Forbush of Alexis thinks


part of the genre’s popularity results from the sheer fun of it. “The most appealing aspect of elec-


tropop to most people is fun … especially live fun,” Forbush said. He says it’s the kind of music people


can “dance, cut loose and party to.” By Justin Stover n


HOT AUTHOR: Rhoda Janzen


themselves lately. However, here’s a quick quiz: how many memoirs have you read that start with a Mennonite upbring- ing, continue through a tragedy like being left for a man named Bob from Gay.com, and make you laugh all the way through? One does. Enter Mennonite in a Little Black Dress by Hope College English professor Rhoda Janzen. Even just from read-


E


ing the dust jacket, one can see that this is a life


veryone and their mother seem to think that they’re interesting enough to write a memoir about


worth writing about — especially with Janzen’s deadpan wit. “Janzen’s memoir deftly weaves us


through her trials of life and love while introducing us to the Mennonite faith of her family upbringing,” says Emily Stavrou of Schuler Books & Music. Fellow memoirist Elizabeth Gilbert


of Eat, Pray, Love fame has praised Janzen’s work, publicly calling it “… not just beautiful and intelligent, but also pain- fully — even wincingly — funny.” It takes finesse to


Rhoda Janzen PHOTO: SHELLEY LALONDE


write about life events that range from the traumatic to the hilarious, but if any- one can do it, it’s Janzen. Think one memoir isn’t enough? A sequel is in the works, now with more Mennonites. By Meaghan Igel n


REVUEWM.COM | AUGUST 2011 | 31


SCENE


SOUNDS | SIGHTS | DINING | SCHEDULE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72