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DINING GUIDE


THE WEST WING. Mediterranean. Chef Raci Erdem has copied the success of his popular Post Falls garlic lovers’ White House (see below) and brought it to the South Hill. The restaurant features all of the favorites Erdem’s fans adore: light, delicate Turkish Cigars, tender, spiced Souvlaki and tons of garlic. The West Wing is affordable for a casual Gryo lunch or decadent enough for a night out on the town, with the flavorful Curried Chicken Ravioli or popular Turkish Plate, with spicy grilled lamb and tzatziki. Don’t forget the breath mints and expect to wait for a table on weekends. Open daily 11 am – 10 pm. 4334 South Regal in Spokane. (509) 443-1660. www.thewhitehousegrill.com/the-west-wing. $-$$$


THE WHITE HOUSE MEDITERRANEAN GRILL. Mediter- ranean. If you love garlic, you’ll love this cozy, romantic restaurant. Here, you feel as if you are in the Mediter- ranean without the high cost of travel. Try the popu- lar Chilean Sea Bass that has turned first timers into regular customers. The Whitehouse offers 110 wine selections and now offers a full bar. Reservations are recommended. 712 N Spokane Street, Post Falls, ID. Mon-Thurs 11-10, Fri-Sat 11-11. (208) 777-9672. www. thewhitehousegrill.com. $-$$$


MEXICAN


BAJIO MEXICAN GRILL. Tucked into the new Northtown Square on Spokane’s northside is bright outpost of the Bajio region in central Mexico. Like other Bajio restau- rants across the west, much of the décor inside comes from its namesake area south of the border along with the inspiration for a menu that features burritos, enchi- ladas, and quesadillas as well as fish tacos and an expan- sive selection of salads that come topped with Bajio’s signature meats. 4805 N Division, Suite 102 in Spokane. (509) 482-7999. www.bajiomexicangrill.com. $-$$


DE LEON FOODS. Mexican. In addition to boasting the best Mexican grocery in the region, De Leon Foods also has a bakery, tortilla factory, and hot food counter on site. Located just a block of Division on East Francis, De Leon serves up several brilliant Hispanic specialties from traditional family recipes and offers catering options. A second location downtown operates solely as a res- taurant. 102 E Francis Ave in Spokane. (509) 483-3033. www.deleonfoods.net.


MEXICAN FOOD FACTORY. 30 years serving great beans, wonderful steamed and shredded chicken, and deep fried tacos with a unique salsa in squirt bottles in the tiny dining room that years ago was a garage station repair bay. Dan Franks shows up at 4 am every weekday morning to start cooking just as his father did for years before him. 11 am – 8 pm Mon-Fri with extended sum- mer hours. 1032 North 4th Street in Coeur d’Alene. (208) 664-0079. www.mexicanfoodfactory.net. $


TECATE GRILL. A friendly Tex-Mex spot in north Spokane with great sauces, margaritas, and $5 All-You-Can-Eat Taco Tuesdays. Try the Tour de Mexico to get a com- bination platter with Carne Asada, a Chile Relleno, and a chicken-and-cheese enchilada in a “three pepper” sauce ironically made without any peppers but plenty of cream. 11 am – 9 pm daily (open later Fri – Sat). 2503 West Wellesley Avenue in Spokane. (509) 327-7817. www.tecate2go.com. $-$$


PIZZA


DAVID’S. The sauce at David’s is made with garlic. The gourmet pies nearly all feature garlic. Even the basic “New Yorker” cheese comes with… you guessed it… flecks of raw garlic.


Mark Starr or his energetic staff to go easy when you order. On the other hand, if you love garlic, you need to try David’s pies. David’s has a nine-year record of popu- larity, 30-year-old Baker’s Pride Y600 ovens that turn out pizzas heated to 600 degrees, and a décor that’s colorful and bold with a fire engine theme and para- phernalia to match. It also makes the most noise about its pies as “New York Style” pizza: characterized by thick, bread-like, outer crust which tapers almost immediately down to a very thin, crisp middle. New York Style crust is usually somewhat charred in appearance and its fans would have it no other way. 829 E Boone. Open daily 10:30-9pm. (509) 483-7460. $$


THE FLYING GOAT. A lot of careful thought went into the design of this pub and pizza sibling of the Downriver Grill, and it is paying off. The Goat offers both classic and artisan toppings on Neapolitan-style pies that get part of their flavor from the “char” on the crust. Try the


190 SPOKANE CDA • July - August • 2011 If garlic makes you nervous, tell


surprising Kiernan and wash it down with a craft beer (14 taps, 1 gravity-fed cask beer, and over 50 more in bottles). The Goat has a mug club for regulars and all the menu items names are linked to the neighborhood – see if you can guess the system. Open daily at 11 am. Closes at 10 pm (11 on Fri and Sat). 3318 West North- west Boulevard in Spokane. theflyinggoat.com. $-$$


(509) 327-8277. www.


SOUTH PERRY PIZZA. Reviewed Apr 2010. Fresh innova- tive pies without over-wrought gourmet pretensions in the heart of the Perry district on Spokane’s South Hill. Located in a former auto body shop, the restaurant has an open kitchen centered around an open-flame pizza oven that turns out brilliant pizzas (try the Margherita, the Veggie, or the Prosciutto) with a yeasty bready crust that has good chew and the right amount of char. 6 microbrews on tap and several fresh salads start things off right. The garage doors roll up in good weather for patio seating. 11 am – 9 pm, Tues - Sun. 1011 South Perry Street in Spokane. (509) 290-6047. www.southper- rypizzaspokane.com. $-$$


PUB AND LOUNGE FARE


DAVE’S BAR AND GRILL. A neighborhood tavern with free popcorn all day long, a surprising family feel inside, and specials at breakfast, lunch, and dinner that have created passionate patrons. Try the monthly special at breakfast or split the massive Killer omelet. The bacon cheeseburger headlines the lunch favorites and steaks, ribs, and chicken (all under $15) keep the tiny galley kitchen hopping all night. Lines out the back door for breakfast on the weekends. 6 am – 10 pm daily. 12124 East Sprague in the Spokane Valley. (509) 926-9640. wwwdavesbarandgrill.com. $-$$


ELK PUBLIC HOUSE. A popular neighborhood hangout, Elk specializes in lamb sandwiches, 74th Street Gumbo and burgers with a twist. Relaxed atmosphere, but noise level can be…festive! It’s a great place to meet on the weekends for lunch or dinner. The Elk has 18 varieties of beer on tap and well-chosen wines. The Elk also has one of the best summer patios around. 1931 W Pacific. Sun-Wed 11-10, Thurs-Sat 11-11. (509) 363-1973. $-$$


NORTHERN LIGHTS BREWERY. Casual, fun and family- friendly with menu choices from Smoked Prime Rib and Cedar Plank Salmon, to Chicken Caesar Wrap and Mediterranean Pasta Salad. Owner and brewmaster Mark Irvin consistently crafts among the finest of Spo- kane’s microbrews. Try the 10 for $11 beer sampler if you are undecided on which of the eight craft beers or additional seasonal ales to drink. 1003 East Trent (Riv- erwalk) in Spokane. Mon-Thurs 11-10, Fri-Sat 11-Close.


seating up to 25 people. Mon-Thurs 11-midnight, Fri- Sat 11-1am, Sun 2-midnight. 10 S Post. (509) 455-8888. $$-$$$


POST STREET ALE HOUSE. This floor to rafter renovation of the former Fugazzi space in the Hotel Lusso by Walt and Karen Worthy of the Davenport gives downtown Spokane a great English-style pub with a striking bar, twenty beers on tap, and a reasonably priced menu built around comfort food. We feel they do some of their fried food particularly well: the Halibut and Chips, the Fried Mozzarella “cubes,” and the Ale House Fried Pickles.


Short Ribs served over mashed potatoes and topped with a pan gravy chunky with vegetables. 11 am – 2 am daily. N 1 Post Street. (509) 789-6900. $-$$


If you are hungry, try the Guinness Braised


THE SWINGING DOORS. Opened in May of 1981, the tavern turned restaurant has been in the same family for its whole life. With 27 beers on tap and 60 television screens, The Swinging Doors is a sports fan’s paradise. On the food front, the restaurant is famous for its large portions (which can be split). Breakfast is served all day and the huge pieces of Broasted Chicken remain the most popular item on the golf-themed menu. Show up for on your birthday for a free steak dinner. Open seven days a week from 6:45 am to 2 am. 1018 West Francis in Spokane. (509) 326-6794. www.theswingingdoors. com. $-$$


THE TWO SEVEN. This South Hill neighborhood restau- rant was created by the owners of The Elk, Moontime, and The Porch. So, it’s no surprise that it has been a hit since day one. Offering unique menu items as well as favorites from the other restaurants (including the corn pasta and infamous Caesar Soft Taco) you will certainly not be disappointed. The wine list is extensive for what may be considered pub-like fare and they have 17 microbrews on tap, which are always phenomenal. The patio seating is always in high demand, but you get the neighborhood-pub feel on the inside as well. 2727 South Mt Vernon #5. Open seven days 11-11. 473-9766. $-$$


(509)


FISH AND SEAFOOD ANTHONY’S AT THE FALLS. A welcome addition to the local seafood scene, Anthony’s combines a spectacular view of the Spokane Falls with an unwavering commit- ment to fresh seafood. So much so that they operate their own fishing company for the sole purpose of supplying their restaurants. The success of this shows up in the always available, rich and flavorful seafood fettuccine and clam chowder, as well as on the fresh


VICTOR’S HUMMUS


www.victorshummus.com


Plenty of companies make hummus, but leave it to local restaurateur Victor from Café Mac in Browne’s Addition to perfect this Mediterranean staple. One bite of his Toasted Sesame variety at a local supermarket and we were sold. Victor produces four flavors of hummus locally with organic garbanzo beans including Chocolate H’Mousse™, a dessert spread full of protein, complex carbs and fiber. He also markets a tzatziki sauce. Currently you can get Victor’s Hummus locally at several Rosauers locations, the Rocket Market, the Main Market Co-Op, Huckleberry’s and Fresh Abundance. Victor’s Hummus has also just been approved by Albertsons for placement in five local locations and he is making plans to expand beyond the local market. Buy a tub now and you’ll be able to claim you were eating it long before it became a national brand.


Sun 11-9pm. (509) 242-BREW (2739). $$


PEACOCK ROOM. It is all about martinis, cold beer and great music. Known as the place to see and be seen, the Peacock Room contributes to Spokane’s vibrant downtown nightlife. Showcasing a giant stained-glass peacock ceiling, the menu features such items as giant prawntinis, open-faced crab sandwiches and gourmet onion rings. Casual attire. Private Dining room available


sheet. The four course “Sunset Dinners” served Mon-Fri from 4-6 for only $18.95 are particularly good values. 510 N Lincoln. Lunch Mon-Sat 11:30-3, Bar Menu in Lounge Mon-Sat 3-4, Dinner Mon-Thurs 4-9:30, Fri-Sat 4-10:30, Sun 3-9:30, Sunday Brunch (breakfast/lunch menu) 11-2pm, Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-6 with half-price appetizers and drink specials. (509) 328-9009. $$-$$$


CEDARS FLOATING RESTAURANT. This is Idaho’s premier


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