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BARBECUE


CHICKEN-N-MORE. “Amazing-Crispy-Tender-Chicken-n- More” could have been the name. It is that good, and Bob Hemphill—full-time cook and part-time preach- er— is telling the truth about the “more” as well: moist ribs slathered in Hemphill’s own sweet and kicking barbeque sauce, cornmeal-breaded catfish fried fresh when you order, pulled pork sandwiches, fiery red beans and sweet crisp coleslaw. Call ahead if you want catfish and save room for the cobbler or sweet potato pie. 414 W Sprague. Mon-Fri 11–8, Sat 1-8. (509) 838- 5071. $-$$


BISTROS


BISTRO ON SPRUCE. This neighborhood bistro offers high-quality fare in a casual, friendly atmosphere. It’s a great spot for a quiet dinner out, or weekend brunch with friends. The menu changes frequently, with tempt- ing selections like Paella, Duck Confit and Butternut Squash Ravioli. Don’t miss the Peppered Chevré with Port-Poached Figs – a sweet, creamy, peppery slice of heaven. The Bistro’s Wine Bar is open in the afternoons for wine and $3.95 tapas. Enjoy outdoor seating in the summertime. If you don’t want to cook, and feel like very reasonably priced upscale food, try Bistro on Spruce. 1710 N Fourth St, Coeur d’Alene. Lunch 11am- 2:30 and Wine Bar and Tapas 2:30-5, Mon – Sat. Dinner Mon-Sat 5-9. Weekend breakfast. 208-664-1774. www. bistroonspruce.com $-$$


DOWNRIVER GRILL. One of north Spokane’s neighbor- hood gems, Downriver Grill offers sophisticated food at affordable prices. Begin with the calamari appetizer or the baked Brie served with chopped red bell peppers and toasted bread. Seafood fettuccine, and a pork osso buco are inventive and beautifully prepared, the latter being perhaps the most succulent,


meat we’ve ever had. Tues-Sun 11-9. 3315 W Northwest Blvd. in Spokane. (509) 323-1600. $-$$$


fall-off-the-bone HAY J’S BISTRO.


located in a Conoco parking lot pulls off high end food in an intimate setting that is a delight given the asphalt and gas pumps fifty feet away. At lunch Hay J’s Bistro offers entrees like a Chicken Pesto Burger and a Black- ened Steak Wrap. Several dinner favorites are the Crab Stuffed Chicken and the Bistro Medallions. Hay J’s also offers catering and has developed a loyal following of locals who feel they no longer need to drive into Spo- kane for an upscale meal. Mon-Thurs 11-9, Fri-Sat 11-10, Sun 3-8. (509) 926-2310. 21706 E Mission Ave, Liberty Lake. www.dinelibertylake.com. $$-$$$


HERBAL ESSENCE CAFÉ. Northwest cuisine. This relaxed downtown restaurant tucked into the middle of a block on Washington serves Northwest bistro food and works hard to offer great service. The menu offers up baseball- cut sirloins, a whole stuffed Dungeness crab and a swordfish steak stuffed with pesto and baked off with a parmesan crust. Try the award-winning house salad, brilliant with sliced pears, crumbled Gorgonzola and a white truffle vinaigrette. 115 N Washington. Lunch Mon- Fri 11-2, Dinner Mon-Sat 5-close. (509) 838-4600. Lunch $-$$, dinner $$-$$$


LAGUNA CAFÉ. This South Hill restaurant


café, but in actuality it is much more. Owners Dan and Debbie Barranti have created a sophisticated combina- tion of gourmet food, great wines, and gifts, while still serving the same great coffee they inherited from the previous tenant, the Deluxe Coffee Company. The din- ner menu features entrees such as Wild Pacific Salmon with fresh rosemary mango salsa and roasted rosemary potatoes or the Flat Iron Steak and Black Tiger Shrimp.” Live music on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday in addi- tion to monthly wine tastings. 4304 S Regal. Mon-Fri 7 am -9 pm, Sat 8 am -9 pm, and Sun 8 am- 9 pm. (509) 448-0887. $-$$


calls itself a


LATAH BISTRO. Four signature pizzas with thin but amazingly tender crusts are just the beginning of an exceptional menu with such items as wild mushroom ravioli in a smoky pancetta cream sauce, seared ahi, and pan-fried calamari. The sugar pumpkin bread pud- ding will spoil your Thanksgiving pie forever. The wine list is surpassed by the startling after dinner chocolate list. Ask for a sampler and fascinating explanation. Latah Bistro also features an ever changing Fresh Sheet and a heated outdoor patio during summer months. 4241 S Cheney-Spokane Rd, off Highway 195. Lunch daily 11:30-2, Happy Hour seven days 2-5, Dinner daily 5-Close. (509) 838-8338. $$-$$$


This surprising Liberty Lake bistro


REGAL STREET SEAFOOD


LINDAMAN’S. This South Hill neighborhood bistro has been serving up made from scratch salads, casseroles and desserts for 25 years. Try the Salad Trio with a rotat- ing selection of creative salads, or for heartier fare order a Twice Baked Potato or Enchilada. The food is served deli-style, making it a popular stop for quick lunches and to-go orders. Or linger on the outdoor patio with a morning DOMA coffee or evening cocktail. Mon-Fri 7-9, Sat 11-9. 1235 S Grand Blvd (509) 838-3000. $-$$


MADELEINE’S CAFÉ AND PATISSERIE. Madeleine’s Café and Patisserie specializes in traditional French and bis- tro-style fare. Pop in for a morning coffee and hand crafted croissant, or take a break from shopping and try the Organic Tomato Mozzarella Tart or one of the many lunch salads, quiches and casseroles. Madeleine’s is a popular spot for weekend brunch, with made-to-order whole wheat pancakes, Croque Monsieur sandwiches and beautiful French pastries. Dinner (Thur-Sat) features rustic French dishes such as cassoulets and crepes, as well as seafood and salads. Take advantage of outside dining in warm weather or grab a street-side table for people watching. Mon-Wed 7:45 am -5 pm, Thu-Fri 7:45 am – 10 pm, Sat 8 am – 10 pm, Sun 8 am – 2 pm. 707 West Main. (509) 624-2253. www.madeleines-spokane. com $-$$$


MAGGIE’S SOUTH HILL GRILL. LA transplant and five year associate of Wolfgang Puck, Maggie Watkins has created a welcome addition to the South Hill neighbor- hood dining scene. Designed with efficiency, afford- ability, and family-friendliness in mind, the food is far more outstanding than the casual surroundings and low prices suggest. For comfort food, try the Chicken Pot Pie or Baked Penne and Cheese. For dinner, flat-iron steak makes a perfect choice. And Maggie’s Signature Salad will make kids of all ages actually want to eat their greens. 2808 E 29th. Mon-Fri 11-9pm, Sat-Sun brunch (breakfast and lunch menu) 8-1pm, Dinner 1 – 9. (509) 536-4745. $


SANTÉ.


the sophisticated French bistro food and charcuterie (in-house prepared and preserved meats) of local-boy- turned-chef, Jeremy Hansen. Throw in Hansen’s passion for sourcing as much of his food locally as possible and you have a recipe for great dining. Santé serves break- fast and lunch daily off a shared brunch menu with several of the most creative egg dishes in the city (try the Shirred Eggs or the Weisswurst Blanquette). Din- ner is served Thursday through Saturday off a separate menu and offers delicious food with bright flavors as well as great options for vegetarians. Gracious service and a seasonally changing menu at the draw.


The Liberty Building is a perfect setting for


Main. (509) 315-4613. www.santespokane.com Daily 8 am - afternoon. Dinner, Thur – Sat, 5 pm - close. $$-$$$


2011. Savory is the South Hill’s newest neighbor- hood darling. The restaurant takes pride in making many ingredients in-house, like the Grilled Mozzarella wrapped in prosciutto. The lunch menu features Panini sandwiches, salads and half a dozen hot entrees. Try the Grilled Eggplant and Tomato Panini or the Savory House Salad with apricots, candied hazelnuts and crisp garbanzos. At dinner you’ll find meat and seafood from the apple wood grill, Asian-inspired Pan Seared Ahi and comfort dishes like Chicken Pot Pie. Full Bar and patio seating in the summer. Mon-Thu 11 am - 2 pm for lunch, 5 pm - 9 pm for dinner; Fri-Sat 11 am - 10 pm; Sun 4 pm - 8 pm. 1314 S Grand Boulevard in Spokane. (509) 315- 8050. www.savoryspokane.com. $$-$$$


SAVORY RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE. Reviewed Jan


WILD SAGE. Tucked into a building on 2nd and Lincoln that used to be an old car dealership, Wild Sage offers an intimate dining setting and memorable food with real flair. Chef Charlie Connor joins three business partners with years of restaurant experience and a determination to never again wear ties. The atmosphere combines class and warmth.


rubbed in a habanero-jerk paste, or the Veal Saltimboc- ca. Finish things off with the Coconut Cream Cake. Also


Try the Yukon Taquitos, the Ahi 404 W


www.regalstreetseafood.com


Heather and Phil Lazone from Northstar Seafoods know fresh fish. For almost a decade they have sold fish wholesale throughout the region—fish that they fly in from “their guy in Alaska” and their fish buyer in the markets in Hawaii among others. Now you can buy the best of what they bring in and cook it yourself. “We used to get calls daily at Northstar with people asking if we sold to the public.” Northstar still doesn’t, but Regal Street Seafood does from its small storefront just off Regal on Spokane’s South Hill. In the case there isn’t a single farm raised fish; it is all wild caught and it is all #1 graded. The staff at Regal Street includes a trained chef who can give you cooking guidance, and they offer a few ready-to-eat options like Cioppino – an Italian fish stew. Fish tacos are about to be added as well and the store stocks sauces and wines that pair well with the fish in the cases. Like” Regal Street on Facebook to get daily sales and insider tips on what just arrived.


OVAL OFFICE. The Oval Office features an expansive selection of cleverly named martinis to compliment a mix of appetizers, salads, and entrees in a casual and intimate converted home. Ask the staff and they are likely to suggest you try the Dirty Monica with some Skinny Secretaries. Mon - Fri 11am-11pm. Sat - Sun, 3pm-11pm. 620 Spokane Street in Post Falls. 777-2102. $-$$


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PICABU BISTRO. Picabu Neighborhood Bistro offers fun, stylish, casual dining in Spokane’s lower South Hill neighborhood. The menu is creative and diverse, alter- nating modern favorites such as Shrimp Phad Thai or Cilantro Hummus with never-out-of-style burgers and seafood. Handmade Chicken Potstickers with ginger, cilantro, and corn are a signature dish and the singular Fire Pasta has become a weekly addiction for many. The children’s menu is a big hit with families. 901 W 14th Ave. (509) 624-2464. www.picabu-bistro.com. Sun-Thurs 11-9, Fri-Sat 11-10. $$


make a point to order something from the bar either with or without alcohol. They use fresh juices and have a great drink line-up. 916 W Second Ave. Dinner seven nights a week, opening 3 pm weekdays and 4 pm week- ends. (509) 456-7575. www.wildsagebistro.com $$-$$$


BREAKFAST AND LUNCH SPECIALTIES


FRANK’S DINER. A cousin to Spokane’s other railroad car diner, Knight’s Diner (and our third place winner), Frank’s has become a Spokane landmark in just over a decade. Both early 1900’s-vintage rail cars were origi- nally obtained by the Knight brothers, Frank and Jack, during the depression, and each converted them to din- ers in Seattle and Spokane, respectively. Larry Brown, of Onion Bar and Grill fame, acquired the Seattle diner in 1991 and moved it to its present location, meticulously restored by well-know local restaurant restoration arti- san, Pat Jeppeson. Frank’s breakfast, lunch and dinner menu, available all day, has all the classics. Among


www.spokanecda.com 187


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