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ly don’t want to mix a brass fixture with a cop- per fixture. Keep the same type of fixtures and materials for the space that you’re in,” advises Tripp. “It’s just good design.” Weather Proof. Especially in the Inland


Northwest, where seasons really do chance, it’s important that outdoor lighting fixtures be made with the most durable materials and fin- ishes to withstand the harsh effects of weather. “Metal resists the elements much beter than plastic,” Tripp says, adding that the majority of professionally installed lighting systems are de- signed to work in all conditions. Light the Way. Soſtly lit paths are especially


appealing to the eye, and are a good idea for any area that may see foot traffic. Lining a pathway with low or medium-height lamps also will cre- ate a safe environment for anyone spending time in the yard. Tripp recommends path lights with hoods or shades that will direct the light down and not up. A three-foot radius of lit area is common. Most path lights are on stems or risers 12 to


16 inches off the ground, so it’s important to pick a style that also looks good in the daylight whether they match the architectural style of your home or add a bit of whimsy with lights resembling flowers, buterflies or gnomes. Natural Light. While some fixtures are


meant to be seen, tower bollard lights are de- signed to blend into their natural surroundings. Typically built into a natural stone housing of granite or basalt, the tower hides the source of light while providing a circle of illumination downward, enhancing the natural beauty of your outdoor decor or landscape design. Create a focal point that highlights your


outdoor motif. Just as a chandelier creates fo- cus in your foyer, build a centerpiece for your outdoor décor. Tink about where you’ll be spending the most time and which areas may need more light. “Landscape lighting is all about creating points of interest. Anything you can do to accent that area with lighting creates a stronger presentation,” Tripp says. He adds that giving yourself the flexibility to control the light levels at that focal piece helps to create dramatic effects. Opt for low-voltage lighting systems. For


the best results, install low-voltage lighting systems instead of solar. Using just 12 volts of electricity, low-voltage lighting out-shines solar lighting because it “throws” the light beter, so you notice the lighting effect, not just the light itself. Also, solar lights fade, but low-voltage sys- tems, when connected to a timer or light sens- ing cell, allow you to control when the lights will be on or off.


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