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6 July 16 - August 5, 2011


CUSD from Page 1 Budget management


“The start of the new school year is a particularly exciting time for us,” Locke says. “Our highest priority has been to maintain our class size, 23 to 1 on average, to recruit and retain the best staff in the industry and to protect quality programs. This has been a real challenge as we enter our fourth consecutive year of budget cuts.”


He explains the city’s growth and a long-term commitment to preparing for slowing enrollment has helped the district maintain quality instruction.


Staffi ng


While 123 teachers retired or resigned, CUSD hired 137 teachers, according to Locke, who notes the district is always looking for quality individuals who work well with children and communicate well with youth and adults alike.


“We have worked hard to position ourselves to attain and retain the very best staff,” he says. “These efforts include one of the best teacher salary schedules in the state, support in the classroom and ongoing training and current technology.”


Technology updates


For this year, the district invested in Infi nite Campus, a new internal software system. Its increased effi ciencies and ability to provide timely information to staff will lead to continued advances in student achievement. The system, which deals with transcripts, scheduling and other logistics, was evaluated and selected from among recommended products by a committee of school and district staff members. “The cost to CUSD was $441,500 for the start up and fi rst year, with the ability to renew at $311,600 in


Community


subsequent years,” says Locke.


Website technology will take a front seat this year as well.


“We are highly encouraging our parents to subscribe to their children’s school, teacher and district web pages. This will enhance our communication efforts and also lead to student achievement as parents partner with us,” Locke says.


The district has provided a wealth of information online at ww2.chandler.k12.az.us.


Staff, school changes


Certain administrative adjustments for the 2011-12 school year affect Southern Chandler families, such as school principal moves and school reallocations. Anthony Smith, previously the principal at Andersen Elementary, is now the principal at Chandler Traditional Academy Freedom Campus. He replaces Wendy Nance, now the director of human resources. Amy O’Neal, previously dean at Santan Elementary, is promoted to its principal. She replaces Heather Anguiano, who left to fi ll the void at Hartford Sylvia Encinas Elementary after the retirement of Jim Tongring.


Paul Bollard is the new principal at Payne Junior


www.SanTanSun.com


Submitted photo


NEW LEADER: Anthony Smith moves from Andersen Elementary to become the new principal at Chandler Traditional Academy Freedom Campus.


Submitted photo


PROMOTION: Previously dean at Santan Elementary, Amy O’Neal is now principal.


Submitted photo


PRINCIPAL MOVES: Paul Bollard, Payne Junior High’s new principal, formerly served in the same capacity at Willis Junior High.


High. He previously served as principal at Willis Junior High and replaces Karen Martin, now assistant principal at Chandler High School.


Chandler adds a new elementary school to its roster this year: Knox Gifted Academy, located east of Alma School and north of Ray on Knox Road. “The Knox Academy is a classic case of ‘build the program and they will come,’” says Locke. “Interest has been tremendous and the staff has been working hard to prepare for the start up. The school will have a Science Technology Engineering Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) component; STEM plus Arts.” Families can expect updates throughout the year about the Hamilton Prep move in 2012. The school, east of Alma School and north of Germann roads, will move to the Erie Elementary campus west of Alma


See CUSD Page 7


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