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Feast & Mishti is a new restaurant concept that has recently opened in London’s Whitechapel, sell- ing coffee, sweets and Bangladesh halal food. The restaurant can seat up to 130 and has created 20 jobs.


Enam Ali MBE, and Spice Business editor, offi- cially opened the new venture in June this year. Guests present at the opening ceremony included the Solicitor Association President, Abdul Kalam, Greater Sylhet Council Chairperson, Barristes Ataur Rahman, London Bangla Press Club President, Bilal Ahmed, Curry Life Magazine Editor Syed. N. Pasha, and Voice for Justice & Community Leader Abu Taher Chowdhury. Also in attendance were British Bangladesh Chamber of Commerce Deputy Director General, Bashir Ahmed, BCA Vice Chairperson Ashraf Ahmed, and many other com- munity leaders, prominent figures in East London, and members of the media.


Speaking at the event Enam Ali pointed out that,


“Mishti (Bengoli traditional dessert), without real- ization, plays such a vital role in our life. It goes with every event or celebration. In our commu- nity, a marriage will never be completed without the mishti. This is how powerful Mishti is. In the middle of the nineteenth century. One of the earli- est pioneers of Mishti, Nobin Chandra Das invented the sweetmeat of ultimate delicacy and named it Rossogolla. Even this unique sweet got appre- ciation from the contemporary Novelist, Rabindra Nath Tagore of Jorasanko, Kolkata who often vis- ited Nobin’s sweet shop at that time. Now Mishti is renowned worldwide as traditional sweet.” Enam added, “Customers will appreciate the nov- elty of this restaurant and we wish it success in inventing a new British Bangladeshi dessert here. I am sure eventually coming to the East End and having a Whitechapel or Mishti will be the same as visiting Yorkshire and having a Yorkshire pudding!”


As well as casual dining, the restaurant offers tra- ditional Bengali sweets such as Rasgoollah, Jalebi, Gulab Jamoon and Ross Malai. Managing director,


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