This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
profile


and delivering materials from 85 countries. Last year it acquired plumbing and heating supplies group BSS for £799 million. TP’s extensive building products portfolio includes heavy building materials merchant Keyline, City Plumbing, ceilings and flooring supplier CCF, Benchmarx kitchens and joinery, Tile Giant, hardware retailer Toolstation and leading DIY chain Wickes. Chief operating officer at Travis


Perkins is John Carter, trained as a timber scientist, who joined the Sandell Perkins arm of the business in 1978 as a management trainee, before the merger with Travis Arnold in 1988 formed Travis Perkins plc. “While around 70 per cent of our market is repair, maintenance and improvement (RMI), the housebuilding industry and new build sector is very important to us,” said Carter, selling to sub-contractors and direct to builders. Travis Perkins is an obvious barometer of building health. In March 2008 business with housebuilders was up two per cent year on year, but by July that year it was down an astonishing 60 per cent – if ever a statistic screamed “fell off the cliff” this was it. It also explains


why all their eggs are not placed in the new-build market. The recession not only hit transaction levels, with TP research indicating that big household spend kicks in nine months after purchase with 80 per cent of spend in the first two to three years, but meant that new kitchens and bathrooms are now competing for the family budget with holidays. However Travis Perkins, supplying materials to the likes of Persimmon, Barratt and Taylor Wimpey, sees obvious wins in dealing with volume builders and housing associations, providing a raft of specified products. The company is looking to collaborate far more closely with the industry, especially with sustainable solutions to deliver. That sustainability starts with taking waste out of the supply chain, with TP’s sheer scale and range of services and products to bundle putting it in pole position to lead that efficiency drive. Carter enjoys a good business relationship with Persimmon chief executive Mike Farley and the merchant and the builder are both sponsors of Premiership rugby club Northampton Saints. “Being Northampton based we have


supported the club for 12 years and it has proved a great and rewarding partnership,” said Carter. Tony Travis, former chairman of Travis Perkins was a non-executive director of the rugby club and in a bygone amateur era it seemed half the Northampton side worked for Travis Perkins. Carter also has great admiration for


the Redrow Homes revival under Steve Morgan with “great kerb appeal” and is hugely impressed by Miller Zero at Basingstoke. “We also do business with Octagon and Millgate and their stand-out products at the top of the market. The challenge is to replicate such quality at more affordable levels.” Core competency around procurement and logistics is crucial to delivering value packages, as well as relationship management between manufacturers and customers and after-sales service. If someone makes


80| July 2011 showhouse


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114