This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
productportfolio


The key to choosing the right


kitchen, says KATE HAMILTON,may just lie with letting the buyers decide for themselves.


The adage ‘you get what you pay for’ has never been truer than when buying a kitchen.While any new kitchen is bound to look impressive, today’s buyers expect it to stand the test of time – a kitchen that will need replacing in five years is simply a false economy. “I think value for money is what housebuilders should look for rather than lowest cost,” says Richard Fitzmaurice, marketing manager at Ellis Furniture. “I’ve seen many kitchens purchased on price alone, only for the customer care issues to erode the cost saving, and damage reputations. At Ellis Furniture we keep our prices very competitive, but we are using real wood and still making many of our own timber doors. That means we’re very confident they’ll last 25 years or longer – but that also means they costs a little more.” It may be an extra cost that buyers


are prepared to stump up for however, as the current economic climate means that many people are looking for a long-term home rather than a quick pit stop on the housing ladder. “The extended economic downturn is


TOP Moore by Design believes that imaginative design needn’t cost the earth THIS IMAGE The Lexington range from Ellis Furniture would not be complete without pure white gloss doors


likely to see homeowners moving less frequently than they have in the past, and therefore they will want big ticket items like kitchens to last longer. Hence they look for better quality,” explains Danny Lay, sales director at Caple. While this school of thinking makes perfect sense, it is important to establish exactly who your buyers are before committing to a top of the line kitchen. After all, the kitchen – like all areas of the property – must reflect the price point and appeal to the correct demographic. But even cheaper properties warrant quality, as Keith Barker, managing director at Nobilia GB, explains. “I think there is some confusion


showhouse July 2011 | 67





Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114