This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
marketing&media


BY


CHERYL MARKOSKY


Hey, big spender


In these somewhat impecunious times, it’s heartening to see someone in the property world actively dipping his hand into his wallet to spend a decent amount on marketing and PR. Housebuilders waiting for someone else to buy the next round, please take note. Nick Crayson, head of upmarket new estate agency Crayson (www.crayson.com) in Notting Hill, west London, is certainly not shortchanging his clients when it comes to getting the word out about their property that’s for sale. Instead of putting a ton of cash into renting a High Street office, Nick and his team are based in Lambton Place, a small mews tucked off very groovy Westbourne Grove. This means he can free up money for high-quality research, brochures, photographs, and even an ex- Saatchi’s award-winning copywriter, so the blurb about the home is several notches above the average cliché-ridden drivel long-suffering buyers usually have to plough their way through. There are new ways to talk about property, according to Crayson, and they don’t have to be boring. “We all know the real shop window is the internet, so I put ads onto all of the best portals. I also spend a lot on double-page spreads and don’t charge our


clients any extra for the privilege,” explains Crayson. He also allocates £1,000 per property for photography – “most agents spend only about a tenth of that sum” – and in the region of £35,000 to advertise a property properly in publications such as the Financial Times, Conde Nast magazines and local magazine, The Hill. “I promise my clients one double-page spread that runs for three months, and if it takes longer to sell, then we carry on,” he adds. Marketing a property properly means having good brochures, advertisements and a strong online presence, argues a punchy Crayson. “We’ve just put a £4.25 million house in Clarendon Road on the market and already have been offered the asking price from a buyer who saw it online. Press coverage helps build up interest and helps with branding, while most purchasers find property online. Print can work as a failsafe too, if someone misses something online.” Will the lack of a High Street presence prove to be problematic at some point? Crayson thinks not, with statistics noting that only six per cent of buyers actually get something from an agent’s window, while over 75 per cent find homes online.


“It doesn’t make sense wasting money on expensive premises. Most window shoppers aren’t serious, they’re just killing time,” he adds. So, maybe it’s time to rethink where resources are allocated in order to make a killing.


showhouse July 2011 | 61


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114