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buildersbreakfast


off,” said Parry, with the couple using the beauty of Scotland’s North Berwick coastline, where they have a cottage, to escape from sales targets. You can imagine a breakfast conversation. ‘You haven’t eaten your toast Alan, what’s on your mind?’ ‘Don’t worry, it can wait – an hour.’ “Importantly in the company people do not treat us


as a married couple and Sue would never compromise the trust and respect of those at CALA who report to her by betraying confidences simply because she is married to the chief executive.” Longevity and loyalty, in this transient industry, tells


you a lot about a company. CALA land director Robert Millar has been with CALA since 1985, starting as a land buyer. Millar, along with Brown, was part of a four-strong young CALA think tank set up by Geoff Ball about 20 years ago to provide fresh thinking. “Robert has been responsible for leading the recent judicial review cases against the government over the way that they have implemented localism. We are fervent supporters of the ethos of localism but felt very strongly that the way CLG tried to remove Regional Spatial Strategies was not legal,” said Brown, with CALA’s Barton Farm proposal in Winchester at the centre of the dispute. “We were the only developer with the strength of character to take this on and our victory has meant that in effect RSS have been restored until such time as local authorities have completed their local plans.” Group financial director Graham Reid has been with CALA for 16 years and was a key figure in the restructuring. “I trust him implicitly with the numbers but more importantly he is a good businessman. In addition to his role as FD he runs our IT department – another major strength – and also is responsible for the Health and Safety team,” said Brown. “CALA works because of a whole series of teams. Regional teams; discipline teams and special teams.


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