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Muskegon Lumberjacks


Muskegon Summer Celebration


MUSKEGON HANGING OUT IN…


Muskegon is a city that works hard and plays hard. While some of the businesses have moved away, others thrive at the hands of entrepreneurs and idealists who keep the city lively. Grab your best pair of jeans and a t-shirt and you can hang out with violin- ists, painters, bikers, activists, industrialists and paupers all under the Taj Mahal of the lakeshore: the beer tent.


T 16 | REVUEWM.COM | JULY 2011


HE MUSKE GON MOTORCYCLE GANG has big bikes and big hearts. In the late 1970s, a group of men and women came together to ride motorcycles and


raise money for charity. They jokingly started to call themselves a gang and the Muskegon Motorcycle Gang name stuck. Over the past three decades, the group has grown to be one of the largest and most recognized motor- cycle clubs in the area. The club has patched members from their early twenties into their 80s and everybody rides hard and hangs out. Besides riding, the club raises money for charities like EVERY WOMEN’S PLACE and the SPECIAL OLYMPICS. Its biggest event is the FREEDOM RUN on July 9, which begins 11 a.m. at HOT ROD HARLEY- DAVIDSON in Muskegon. Held to honor fallen riders, organizers expect more than 500 bikes to make the run. Last year, more than $20,000 was raised for WEBSTER HOUSE YOUTH SERVICES and GILDA’S CLUB. This is a public event and everyone with a motorcycle and an ability to help is welcome.


Whether charitable or churlish, all bikers end up at PAT’S ROADHOUSE (157 S. Getty St.). Grab your best leather jacket and head over to the Muskegon landmark. Pat’s Roadhouse offers classic pub grub, frosty Buds and stiff drinks with a laid-back vibe. If you like your bars a little more upscale, try the TIPSY TOAD TAVERN (609 W. Western Ave). This


classic tavern boasts a wood bar, hard rock on the sound system and a roof deck during the summer. Let General Manager Darlene Krause walk you through the menu and get you one of the bar’s cheap drinks. The cheeseburger I had there was the best in town.


by Steven Geoffrey de Polo


stevendepolo@revuewm.com


After grabbing a brew, head over to watch the MUSKEGON LUMBERJACKS play in the L.C. WALKER ARENA (955 Fourth St.). The Lumberjacks were established in 2010 and play in the United States Hockey League. This is junior hockey, which means the players can develop their talents while maintaining their amateur status. The young team plays fast and physical hockey with the players always dictating the play. Muskegon is a great place to watch games. The city has an 80-year hockey tradition, fans are passionate, the arena underwent a multi- million dollar upgrade and the team is stocked with many Michigan players. High- scoring rookie Ryan Lomberg


(99 goals in 57 high school games) will be fun to watch under the tutelage of new assistant coach Steve Palmer.


The MUSKEGON COUNTY MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY (7 East Center St.) in Muskegon Heights developed out of the county’s civil rights movement in the 1960s. As times changed, the organizers wanted to go beyond protests to make a difference in Muskegon. “You can demon- strate and yell, but unless you know your history, you will never make any progress,” said Museum Chairman Dr. James Jackson.


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