This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Running your boat


much smaller than the house you’re used to; and keeping warm in winter, emptying the toilet on rainy nights, and dealing with 12v electrics all have their own challenges.


STAYING IN ONE PLACE


Residential boaters may decide to live in one spot on a permanent residential mooring, building up a lifestyle amongst the local waterway community.


But only a minority of moorings is available for residential use, and obtaining one of these will require a good deal of research. Make sure you fi nd a mooring fi rst: do not buy a boat and expect to fi nd a residential mooring in your chosen town. Demand is especially high in London, the south-east, Bath and Bristol. Once you have identifi ed an available mooring, you should check that the mooring is in fact a recognised residential mooring – even if it’s previously been used for residential purposes. A simple question to ask the previous occupant is “Are you paying Council Tax?” Talk to the mooring operator, whether it is a private marina or British Waterways (0845 671 5530). Don’t forget that your boat still needs to have a BSS Certifi cate (or RCD certifi cate),


Photo: Calcutt Marina


third party insurance and licence. (BW has special licences for houseboats which are not capable of moving.)


MOVING AROUND THE SYSTEM What if you want to take fully to the waterway lifestyle, always cruising from one village to the next? In that case, you need not arrange a permanent mooring. Instead, you can declare to British Waterways that you are ‘continuously cruising’.  is is the one exception to the need for a mooring before a licence is issued. However, the guidelines for this are strict.


BW say that any such boat must genuinely be used for navigation throughout the period of the licence, and must not stay in the same place for more than 14 days. It is the responsibility of the boater to satisfy BW that the requirements are met. Some owners negotiate a permanent residential mooring in a marina for the cold winter months, and cruise extensively during the summer. Most commercial operators are fl exible in negotiating fees for a mooring of this kind. Residential boaters may sometimes fi nd a permanent berth at a marina when space is available, because they add to the general sense of security of the marina during the off season, but this will bring duties with it. BW also turns some towpath visitor moorings over to ‘winter moorings’ for these boaters: your local BW offi ce can advise.


Continuous cruising is not an alternative to


fi nding a permanent mooring, but a lifestyle choice in itself. It’s unlikely to be an option if you are tied to a full-time job in one place, or if you have children who need to travel to school. ‘Towpath shuffl ing’ is increasingly being targeted by British Waterways and is greatly resented by most boaters.


32


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68