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Running your boat


and non-tidal from Allington Lock up to the Leigh Barrier in Tonbridge, though only connected to the main waterway system by a tricky coastal passage. Short-term licences are available from the offi ces at Allington and Yalding locks, and from a number of marinas. For information on all of these, including downloadable forms, maps and navigation guides, see the EA website at www.environment-agency.gov.uk/navigation. Telephone enquiries now go through a central offi ce at 08708 506506, which will answer your questions or pass you on to their regional offi ces to deal with local queries.


NORFOLK AND SUFFOLK BROADS  is intricate system of rivers and broads, popular with pleasure-boaters for over a century, is run by the Broads Authority. Both navigation authority and national park, the BA issues licences, regulates boating and preserves the beauty of this special place. Licence details are available on 01603 610734 or from www.broads-authority.gov.uk. OTHER WATERWAYS Below Teddington Lock, the River  ames is administered by the Port of London Authority.  e PLA makes no charge and does not issue licences, but you should study its Recreational Users’ Guide; the river can be strongly tidal and you will encounter commercial traffi c. (01474 562200, www.pla.co.uk)  e River Avon in Warwickshire is run by the independent Avon Navigation Trust (01386 552517, www.shakespearesavon.co.uk) – not to be confused with the Bristol Avon, which is run by BW.  e River Wey, which leaves the  ames


at Weybridge, is run by the National Trust. Short-term licences are available at the fi rst lock.  ere are no residential moorings. (01483 561389)  e Basingstoke Canal


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branches off the Wey, and is also run independently (01252 370073, www.basingstoke-canal.co.uk).


VISITING WATERWAYS You will usually buy an annual licence for the waterway where your boat is moored – but what if you want to visit others? All the navigation authorities offer short- term licences. On the  ames you can buy one at the fi rst lock you come to; on other waterways, where the locks are not staffed, you should apply by post or buy at a marina. For the dedicated explorer, you can buy a Gold Licence.  is covers both BW and all EA waters, though it is more expensive than either’s annual licence. It is administered by BW (01923 201120, www.britishwaterways.co.uk).


MOORINGS


Finding a mooring is an essential part of becoming a boat-owner – but one which is often overlooked. After all, as soon as your boat is complete, you will need somewhere to keep it.  e soaring popularity of inland boating in recent years led to moorings shortages in popular areas. Fortunately, a raft of new marinas have recently opened, and more are under construction. Even so, don’t leave it until the last moment to sort your mooring: get on a waiting list as soon as you can.


MARINA MOORINGS


Marina moorings are the most convenient, with high levels of service and access to the boat by way of a pontoon.  ey will have have a convenient water supply and many also have 240v electricity hook- ups on the pontoons. Fuel will usually be available on site, and and there may be workshop facilities, slipways, pump-out, and convenient secure car parking.  ey are also


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