This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
SanTan FAMILY FUN Cool summer fun Cool summer fun SUBMITTED photo


AARGH: See a puppet show this summer, such as “The Monkey and the Pirate” at the Great Arizona Puppet Theater. It’s worth the drive to the downtown Phoenix venue, which is also available for birthday parties.


retail selection in Phoenix. For the ultimate hands- on puppet adventure, rent Peter’s Party Room before and after a show, where guests design and make hand puppets then put on a show at a special child-size stage.


Great Arizona Puppet Theater is at 302 W. Latham St., Phoenix. Call for performance schedule. Fees: $8 adults, $6 children ages 2 and older. It’s best to reserve tickets at least one day in advance. Peter’s Party Room rental is $100 plus $5 admission for each attendee. Info: 602-262-2050, www.azpuppets.org.


Comics, cranes ‘n’ cactus


Toddlers and school-aged children alike will find something fun to do at the Arizona Museum


from Page 1


for Youth. ArtVille offers kids younger than 5 a vibrant world of colors and textures to explore, while older children can learn the fundamentals of creativity through drawing and building in ArtZone. Then it’s off to visit seasonal exhibits like “Play Ball!,” a visual history of Cactus League baseball, and “Peanuts at Bat: The Life and Art of Charles Schulz.” SanTan Sun area residents can also fold an origami bird for the museum’s One Thousand Paper Cranes initiative. Upon completion, the birds will be shipped to Japan and displayed at the Children’s Peace Monument in Hiroshima.


Arizona Museum for Youth is at 35 N. Robson St., Mesa. Hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, closed Monday. Fee: $7 ages 2 and older. Info: 480-644-2468, www.arizonamuseumforyouth.com.


Staging summer fun


Valley Youth Theatre is dedicated to fostering love of the performing arts and gives kids a chance to have a great time onstage, behind the scenes or in the audience. Children can develop their acting skills via classes and workshops; learn about what it takes to stage a performance through day camps and even audition for acting and orchestra roles in upcoming shows. For those who would rather watch than participate, the summer schedule features performance of the musicals “Annie,” “The Wiz” and “Hairspray.” Valley Youth Theatre is at 525 N. 1st St., Phoenix. Hours: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through


Friday. Call for show times. Ticket prices start at $16.50. Info: 602-253-8188, www.vyt.com.


Play to learn


With more than 70,000 square feet of floor space filled with exhibits designed to “engage the minds, muscles and imaginations of 0- to 10-year- olds,” the Children’s Museum of Phoenix is a prime destination for hands-on fun. The summer’s star attraction is the newly-opened Schuff- Perini Climber, a massive three-story structure constructed out of 50 tons of structural steel and adorned with various unexpected found objects. More than just a series of stairs and tubes, the Climber boasts a flying bathtub, dream boat, recycled rocket and fish walk that visitors can climb over, onto and into. The also museum offers a Noodle Forest, Art Studio, Grand Ballroom and dedicated gallery for those younger than 3 to safely play and explore.


Children’s Museum of Phoenix is at 215 N. 7th St., Phoenix. Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Fee: $11 for ages 1 and older. Info: 602-253-0501, www.childrensmuseumofphoenix.org.


Miriam Van Scott of Kerby Estates is a freelance writer and Chandler transplant from the Washington, D.C. area. She can be reached at Miriam@SanTanSun.com.


June 2011 5


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80