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BUSINESS WORLD SINGAPORE BOOK OF RECORDS


Health & Beauty First Ice House


Whampoa’s Ice House was built in 1854 by Whampoa Hoo Ah Kay and Gilbert Angus. Located on the banks of the Singapore River near the corner of River Valley Road and Hill Street, it stocked ice from the United States. With consumption of only 400 to 500 lbs a day, the business was unprofi table. The landmark remained until 1981, when it was pulled down for the widening of River Valley Road.


First Ice Works


The Singapore Ice Works was established at the junction of Sungei Road and Pitt Road in the 1930s. It was a pioneer establishment that brought refrigeration to Singapore. It was renamed the New Singapore Ice Works in 1958. Later, the factory was bought over by Cold Storage.


Largest Ice Supplier


Tuck Lee Ice has the widest distribution network for its ice in Singapore. It has a production capac- ity of 200 tons of food-grade ice a day. It services its customers round- the-clock every day with its 39 refrigerated trucks. It has the widest variety of ice products from tube ice to dry ice and ice carving concepts.


Oldest Established Medicated Oil Firm


Chop Wah On, established in 1916, is Singapore’s oldest existing medicated oil company.


First Vegan Non-Dairy Ice Cream


Denise Lim from Wholesome Delights Pte Ltd has created the fi rst ice-cream that does not contain any dairy products, eggs, soy or any artifi cial additives. It is made mainly from brown rice, fruits and nuts. It is suitable for vegetarians, vegans and those who are lactose-intolerant. Tasting like normal ice cream, Brownice was introduced in stores in July 2010.


Largest Health Food Chain


GNC is the world’s largest chain of health food stores since the 1930s. Today, there are more than 5,800 GNC stores worldwide. Global Active, headquartered in Singapore, is the sole franchisee for GNC in Singapore, Australia and Malaysia. It owns the RichLife franchise in China and operates more than 200 retail stores spanning these countries.


Best Selling Detox Product Largest TCM Chain


Eu Yan Sang was founded in 1879 and currently has a distribution network of 155 traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) retail outlets in Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Macau and China. It has 40 retail shops or counters in Singapore. It also operates a chain of 20 TCM clinics in Singapore and Malaysia and one medical centre in Hong Kong.


From 2005 to 2009, Hi-Beau International sold 247,077 units of Avalon in Singapore. Retail chains Guardian, Unity and Watson have given the product awards for its popularity and sales volume.





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