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WORLD RECORD Monuments & Landmarks World’s Largest Fountain Longest Rope Bridge


Connecting Palawan Beach in Sentosa to the islet claimed as the southernmost point on continental Asia is a suspended rope bridge.


First Statue Of Sir Stamford Raffl es


The original bronze statue of Sir Stamford Raffl es was created by Thomas Woolner in 1887 and placed at the centre of the Padang. In 1919, on the centenary of Singapore’s founding, it was relocated to the front of the Victoria Memorial Hall and Theatre. In 1969, on the 150th anniversary of the founding, the government erected another, a white replica beside the Old Parliament House, by the Singapore River.


First Public Fountain Longest Cable-Stayed Bridge


Opened in Jan 2008, Keppel Bay Bridge is the fi rst public bridge built by a private developer. Spanning 250m, it links Marina at Keppel Bay and homes on the private Keppel Island to the mainland. The bridge was designed by DCA Architects and TY Lin International at a cost of S$30 million.


First Double Helix Bridge


The Cox Group and engineers Arup from Australia, and Singapore-based Architects 61 designed an entirely new concept in bridge construction, based on the double helix structure of DNA. The double helix carries a pedestrian walkway and a six-lane vehicular bridge at Marina Bay. It is a world fi rst as it did not use any of the known support mechanisms which categorise all bridges built to date. The concept enables the use of much lesser steel than conventional bridge designs. Made of duplex stainless steel material, the 565-ton Helix Bridge has a total span of 280m. The fabrication work was carried out by TTJ Design and Engineering and completed in 2010.


The Tan Kim Seng Fountain was built in 1882 in Fullerton Square near Johnston’s Pier, to commemorate Tan Kim Seng’s generous donation towards the construction of a fresh water supply system. In 1925, the foun- tain was moved to Connaught Drive next to the Cenotaph.


Tallest Monument


The Civilian War Memorial is dedicated to civilians who perished during the Japanese Occupation of Singapore (1942-1945). It is located opposite Raffl es City. The structure of four pillars soar to more than 68m symbolising the shared ‘war experiences’ of the Chinese, Indians, Malays and other races.


Wheel Tallest Observation


The Singapore Flyer, on Raffl es Avenue, is the world’s tallest observation wheel when it started rotating on 11 Feb 2008. It stands at 165m, or 42 storeys high. It can take 784 passengers at a time. Each ride lasts about 37 min.


First Merlion Statue


The fi rst Merlion statue was built in 1972. It stood 8m tall at its original location at the mouth of the Singapore River. The Merlion was built by a local craftsman, Lim Nang Seng. In 2002, it moved from the mouth of the Singapore River to the Merlion Park, located next to One Fullerton.


The Fountain of Wealth, located at Suntec City, is the world’s largest fountain at 1,683.07 sq m. Built at a cost of S$6 million, it has four bronze legs which support a ring 21m in diameter. The central vertical jet can shoot up to 30m.


Tallest Free Standing Observation Tower


The 130m-tall Tiger Sky Tower opened in Feb 2004, next to the Cable Car Station in Sentosa. At any one time, a maximum of 72 people can take a ride in the revolving cabin that goes up the tower to enjoy a panaromic view of Singapore,


Oldest Public Drinking Fountain


The fountain originally stood at Raffl es Place in 1864 but is now relocated in the grounds of the National Museum. Still working, it was donated by auctioneer John Gemmill.


Sentosa, the South- ern Islands, right up to neighbouring Malaysia and the Indonesian islands. It takes about 7 min to reach the top.


Largest Merlion


The height of the Merlion found in Sentosa is 37m. There are 320 scales on the Merlion with 16,000 fi bre-optic and iridescent lights.


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