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BUILDINGS & PLACES SINGAPORE BOOK OF RECORDS


Roads First Road


High Street was constructed in 1821 by convict labourers. It was the fi rst street in Singapore to have a stone hardcore base sealed with laterite.


Longest Road


The longest road in Singapore is the Pan Island Expressway (PIE). It stretches 42.8 km from Tuas to Changi. It was constructed in 1966-1981.


First Air-Conditioned Streets Three of the oldest streets in Singapore - Malay, Malabar and Hylam Streets - were covered with glass and air-conditioned in 1995. The streets lie within Bugis Junction shopping mall and are the only air- conditioned streets in Singapore.


Bridges First Drawbridge


On the site of the present Elgin Bridge stood a wooden drawbridge in 1819. It was the fi rst bridge over the Singapore River and was known as Presentment Bridge or Monkey Bridge, linking North Bridge Road and South Bridge Road.


First Suspension Footbridge


Built in 1998, the suspension footbridge spans the Geylang River and allows residents of Tanjong Rhu to cross over to the National Stadium.


Longest Bridge And First Viaduct First Bridges Shortest Road


The shortest road in Singapore is Tua Kong Green, near Upper East Coast Road. It measures just 26m.


First Pedestrian Underpass


The fi rst pedestrian underpass was constructed in 1964 at Connaught Drive.


First Flyover Toa Payoh Flyover, completed in May 1970, is the fi rst fl yover to be built here. Costing S$3.2 million, it spanned Thomson Road and was intended to relieve congestion at the junction.


First Underground Road The underground sections of the Central Expressway (CTE), were the only underground roads in Singapore till the Fort Canning Tunnel opened in Jan 2007. The CTE tunnel went underneath previously built-up areas, including the Singapore River, Fort Canning Park and Orchard Road. The CTE opened in 1991.


Largest Road Project


The 12-km long Kallang/Paya Lebar Expressway (KPE) is the largest road project to be carried out in Singapore. It connects the East Coast Parkway (ECP) in the south to the Tampines Expressway (TPE) in the north-east. It includes a 9-km long tunnel section, which was completed in 2008, and is the longest road tunnel in South-East Asia.


The Presentment Bridge underwent many repairs and was fi nally replaced by a wooden footbridge, which was named Thomson Bridge after John Thomson who constructed it. In 1862, it was replaced by an iron bridge im- ported from Calcutta, and named Elgin Bridge after Lord Elgin who was the Governor-General of India. The Cavenagh Bridge was built in 1869. The Coleman and Ord Bridges were built in 1886, and the Read Bridge, in 1889. Anderson Bridge was built in 1909.


Benjamin Sheares Bridge was offi cially opened in 1982. The bridge spans Marina Bay and is part of the East Coast Expressway. It is 1.8 km long and rises 20m above the ground.


First Pedestrian Overhead Bridge


The fi rst pedestrian overhead bridge was built at Collyer Quay in 1964. The 34m bridge is now part of the Change Alley Aerial Plaza.


First Steel Suspension Bridge


Smallest Bridge


The smallest public bridge in Singapore is the ‘Three-Step Bridge’ found at the Chinese Garden. It takes just three steps to walk across this bridge.


The Cavenagh Bridge, built in 1869, is the oldest bridge still in its original design. Originally the bridge could be raised to allow passing vessels but soon it could not withstand the increasing traffi c. It became a pedestrian bridge in 1910.


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Highest Pedestrian Bridge Spanning 274m across Henderson Road, the 36m-high wave-shaped Henderson Waves is the highest pedestrian bridge. The bridge links up the hills from Mount Faber Park to Telok Blangah Hill Park. Costing S$12.5 million and completed in 2008, the 8m-wide bridge is made of steel and timber decking. The bridge, commissioned by URA, was designed by RSP Architects. The main contractor was Evan Lim & Co and TTJ Design & Engineering fabricated and installed the bridge’s steel structure.


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