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BUILDINGS & PLACES SINGAPORE BOOK OF RECORDS


Housing First Satellite Town


Queenstown is Singapore’s fi rst satellite town, with 110,000 people housed in 17,000 units. It was built in the 1960s.


WORLD RECORD Largest HDB Estate


Jurong West, with a population of about 236,600 and a total of 69,650 HDB fl ats as at 31 Mar 2008, is Singapore largest housing estate.


First DBSS Project First New Town


Toa Payoh is the fi rst town to be comprehen- sively planned by the government. Beginning in 1962, squatters were cleared and redevelop- ment started in 1964. This is the fi rst town to incorporate a town centre, garden, library and light industries that provide employment for residents.


First Houses Developed By SIT


The Singapore Improvement Trust (SIT) was formed in 1927 and administered by the British colonial authority. Its main tasks were to clear slum areas, acquire land for rehousing and construct houses. The fi rst houses erected by the SIT in 1932 were on Lorong Limau.


First Condominium


The Beverley Mai on Tomlinson Road was built in 1974. It was the fi rst housing block in Singa- pore to incorporate shared common facilities like a swimming pool.


First Condo With Lifts Opening Directly To Apartments


First Public Housing Estate


The Tiong Bahru estate, built in the 1930s, was the fi rst project undertaken by the Singapore Improvement Trust.


Oldest HDB Flats


HDB was established in Feb 1960. Within its fi rst month, piling started at Stirling Road and Blocks 45, 48 and 49 are currently HDB’s oldest. Each of the seven-storey block has 15 units on every fl oor and they share communal chutes located at either end of the fl oor.


The 25-storey Futura, built in 1976, was the second condominium to be built in Singapore. It was the fi rst residential project to incorporate lifts that open directly into the apartments. It was sold en bloc in 2006.


Smallest Condominium Apartments


Launched in 2009, the Suites@Guillemard have four units with a fl oor area of 258 sq ft each. The unit is smaller than the smallest HDB studio apartment at 377 sq ft.


HDB’s fi rst Design, Build and Sell Scheme (DBSS) project is the 616-unit Premiere @ Tampines, which drew nearly 6,000 appli- cations when it was launched in 2006. It was built and marketed by Sim Lian Group Limited. Like condominiums, DBSS projects have built-in wardrobes, kitchen cabinets and better


architecture fi nishes, but do not have facilities such as pools.


First Condo With Living Room Parking Bay


At the Hamilton Scotts, all 56 units will be equipped with their own private parking bay. At Scotts Road, the 30-storey tower is the fi rst residential high-rise in Singapore and the third in the world, after developments in New York and Dubai, to have this parking feature. Residents will be able to drive their vehicle into a special glass elevator that will lift the vehicle from the ground fl oor to their ‘porch’ adjacent to their living rooms. Hayden Properties is the project’s developer.


First Foreign Workers’ Housing


The British used convict labour for their earliest construction work. The fi rst group of around 80 convicts were brought from Ben- coolen (present day Bengkulu) on 18 Apr 1825. A week later another 122 convicts were settled here. The convicts were housed in improvised wooden sheds around the area where Empress Place is today.


Most Expensive House


Arwaa Mansion located at Nassim Road, worth at least S$120 million, is possibly the most expensive residential house in Singapore. Owned by the Brunei Sultan’s brother, Prince Jefri Bolkiah and the country’s national invest- ment agency, the house sits on a land area of about 110,000 sq ft.


Longest Lasting Residential House


Panglima Prang was the oldest surviving house in Singapore in 1982, before it was de- molished to give way to condominiums. It was a bungalow situated at Jalan Kuala, off River Valley Road, built before 1860 by Tan Jiak Kim, pioneer of Singapore’s fi rst medical school and grandson of Tan Kim Seng. It was the home of six generations of Tan Kim Seng’s family before the land was sold to a private developer.


Largest Home-Use Solar Installation


In 2008, photo-voltaic cells were installed on the roof of a bungalow in the Tanglin area. The 15.66 KWp installation uses mono-crystalline frameless laminates.


Longest Condominium Building


PAGE 160


Singapore’s longest condominium building, The Linear, measures 308m long by 22.65m wide. The 221-unit project at Upper Bukit Timah Road was developed by Creative Investments, a subsidiary of Amara Holdings. The architects were Kenzo Tange Associates & SAA Architects.


Longest Sky Garden


Pinnacle@Duxton, besides being the tallest HDB apartments, has 12 skybridges running across the 50th and 26th levels. The skybridges add up to make the Sky Garden, the longest in the world. TTJ Design & Engi- neering was responsible for the lifting of the 354-ton skybridge which is equivalent to the weight of a Boeing 747. The bridge was lifted using four units of 180-ton hydraulics jacks.


Tallest HDB Blocks


Singapore’s tallest HDB apartment blocks, Pin- nacle@Duxton, were completed in 2010, with 1,848 three-bedroom apartments in seven 50-storey blocks.


Most Expensive New HDB Flat


A unit on the 49th storey of Pinnacle@Duxton went for S$645,800, making it Singapore’s costliest new public fl at.


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