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/// ECLECTIC


by Audria Larsen | audria@revuewm.com World’s Longest Breakfast Table


world headquarters and onetime hub of Post brand cereals. “At one point, we had over 100 ce-


T


real industries in Battle Creek,” said Festival Manager Deborah Owens. The annual Cereal Festival celebrates the


modern breakfast staple eaten with a spoon. But the event also spotlights the Kellogg company, as well as health and wellness of the community and commemorates the his- tory of Battle Creek itself. What was once a four-hour event has grown to a fourteen-hour breakfast bonanza. The highlight of the event is free break-


fast, served to all who sit at The World’s Longest Breakfast Table, which is comprised of more than a hundred tables. “We try to have a table for every year


the city is old. Our first table will be for 1859,” Owens said. “We have a year on the table and a historical fact and businesses buy sponsorships. They bring volunteers from their company and they wait on you folks that come to the table.” After breakfast, many of the activities


are geared toward fitness and getting people moving. New this year, the Battle Creek Skatepark


Project will feature 15,000 square feet of ramps for skateboards and BMX bikes. The Tennis Clinic will get you swinging and all the local sports teams from football to ice hockey are hosting events. The kiddos can go wild at the Children’s Healthy Living Activities station.


And, you can even promote someone else’s health by donating blood. Other attractions include the


Classic Car Club event the Slow Drag, where the last car to finish is the winner. And, the arts and crafts fair, Cereal City Festival Parade and live music also offer low-key entertainment options. Breakfast goers can even


BATTLE CREEK CEREAL FESTIVAL Battle Creek June 10-11


FREE! bcfestivals.com


glad-hand with famous faces. “All of the cereal characters are out. Tony


is out, Sugar Bear is out. I grew up with Tony the Tiger and I’ve got pictures of him,” Owens


Other Eclectic Events | by Audria Larsen


National Asparagus Festival Downtown Hart June 10-12 nationalasparagusfestival.org


Get speared at the National Asparagus Festival. This annual event celebrates the delectable vegetable loved by many and reviled by some. Take in the Grand Parade, browse the arts and crafts fair, ogle the Asparagus Queen, vote on your favorite themed dish and experience the grip- ping motorcycle run. Anything can happen…just make sure you have a fistful of greens.


20 | REVUEWM.COM | JUNE 2011


Island Festival Downtown Kalamazoo June 16-18 Free-$8 islandfestkalamazoo.com


Whether you’re down with Dub, Marley-style reggae or simply love Caribbean culture, the 16th


annual Island


Festival will keep your spirits high with steady grooves and sumptuous grub. Nosh everything from Sunset Scampi to Fire Thigh Sammies and experience an all-star musical lineup featuring local and national acts.


Chalk Art Festival Byron Center June 17-18 wmcaf.com


Spring and summer is the time when chalk art can be found decorating driveways, sidewalks and public spaces. The West Michigan Chalk Art Festival celebrates all types of chalk art created by young people as well as adults. Official participants will receive 24 pieces of chalk and local, famed artist Paul Collins will be on hand working with youth artists. Browse the art or create your own!


said. “If you look back, Tony has taken on an adult look, gone from little to Tony to mature Tony. I think we just celebrated 100 years, but he doesn’t look 100 years old.” More than a weekend


devoted to cereal, “it’s about community, it’s about healthy living and it’s about our economy.” n


HIS MONTH 20,000 TO 50,000 people will flock to Cereal City, otherwise known as Battle Creek. The Breakfast Capital of the World is home to the Kellogg Company’s


SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE


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