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mavens from New York and California to this laid-back sum- mer resort village. But you don’t have to be a Tinseltown temptress to enjoy the show. This reporter caught up with festival co-founder Hopwood Depree while he was in Hollywood. When asked about the festival’s success he said,


B Waterfront Film Festival HANGING OUT IN…


SAUGATUCK & DOUGLAS


Built on the bones of the ghost town of Singapore, the residents of Saugatuck (and Douglas) never take their charming towns for granted. Sustained by Chicago va- cation dollars and boater bucks, Saugatuck has kept its small-town feel in an age of big-box baloney. Bring the kids for a day of swimming on the beach and shopping on Main Street. Come back later for dinner and dancing into the night.


16 | REVUEWM.COM | JUNE 2011


“People can relax on the beach and eat at one of the fabu- lous restaurants during the day. At night, everyone comes together to watch these amazing films shown in unusual spaces like boat sheds.” Netflix can never duplicate that collec- tive experience, sitting together in the dark and watching a film projected on a big screen. Get the $200 SuperPass and you’ll have priority seating for all of the films and seminars.


by Steven Geoffrey de Polo


stevendepolo@revuewm.com


Head to MASON STREET WAREHOUSE (400 Culver St.) if you prefer your performances live. This professional Equity theatre is not your grandma’s community theatre. “We try to give people variety,” said Mason Street Producer Ellen Engle. That means offering plays not been seen in West Michigan or re-staging old standbys staged in a new way. Chicago (June 24-July 17) will be directed by Kurt Stamm, who was associate director for the Broadway production of Fosse that won the 1999 Tony Award for Best Musical. Kurt will bring that same Fosse flavor to Chicago. The 2011 season includes Five Guys Named Moe (July 22-Aug. 7), a musical featuring Louis Jordan’s greatest Jazz hits, The 39 Steps (Aug. 12-28), a Hitchcock thriller meets Monty Python farce and Scott Nevins’ One Night Stand (Aug. 31-Sept. 4), a Hollywood snarkfest with the host of TruTV’s (huh?) “The Smoking Gun Presents.”


The culture continues at the OX-BOW SUMMER SCHOOL OF ART (3435 Rupprecht Way). For more than 100 years, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago has operated a summer art colony here. The heart of the campus is the handsome Ox-Bow Inn, built in 1873 and completely renovated and expanded in 2006. The campus includes 30 brightly colored studio buildings and residential cabins sur- rounded by 115 acres of dunes, forests and trails. The Art on the Meadow Workshops are tailored for West Michigan residents and seasonal visitors. The four-day workshops are held June through August with themes such as “Shapes and Colors of Nature” for children and “Puppetry Immersion” for adults and teens. You can meet the Ox-Bow artists at the Friday Night Open Studios. Held twice a month, visitors can poke around the artist studios, view the work made the previous week and attend demonstrations. The evening ends with some work being auctioned to benefit the school.


ecause of the WATER-FRONT FILM FESTIVAL, Saugatuck is known from Hollywood to Halifax. Held this year June 9-12, the non-profit festival is one of the top five film festivals in the country. It at- tracts directors, producers, actors and movie


SCHEDULE | DINING | SIGHTS | SOUNDS SCENE


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