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Race Reports


Well, like Titanic, this report has not only given the ending away in the title, but has probably taken you as long to read as it would to have to watch it. Sorry about that, but hope you stuck with it.


Finishers List Posn


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25


Surname Meade Zeidan Pearce Lockett Finn


First


Richard Michael Ben


Andrew Julie


SADLIER IVAN Robert


Matthew Paul


Brightwell Simon Fox


Ferguson


Haywood Mitchell Curtis Smith


Brackett Afshar


John


MCDONAGH LUKE Green Salter


Malcolm Jenny Simon David


Anthony Helen Paul Dan


Andrew Paul


Overal Time 11:04:00 12:04:00 12:06:00 12:07:00 12:08:00 12:34:00


Humphreys-Evans Giles 12:45:00 Mcburney John Treadwell Hart Britt


Merrell


12:50:00 12:59:00 13:04:00 13:13:00 13:19:00 13:33:00 13:34:00 13:36:00 13:45:00 13:46:00 13:50:00 13:54:00 13:54:00 14:04:00 14:20:00 14:39:00 15:04:00


MACKAY HEATHER 15:08:00


26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65


Cuttle


TILLER Gordon


Ben NICK


LIENERT ROHAN Calkins Stout Hall


Julie Paul Ian


Matkin Allen


Meston


Penny Paul Niki


John


Paul Paul


15:24:00 15:26:00


Goldthorp Wendy Conroy Harris Michael Adams West


Stephen


Blackwood Mark LOADER GAVIN Darlow Ali


MASTERS LEE Stevenson Nicola Shenton Lundie


Rob Ben


TAYLOR Booth


De Belder Daniel Charalambous Charlie


Mark


MacDonald Jay Di Meo


Wakefield Robbins Diment Healey


Wilkinson Hatton


Marchesi Smith Barton Hill


Alfredo John Phil


Daniel Becky Nick Katie


Andrew Lee


Paul Janet


Alexander 15:28:00 15:44:00 15:50:00 15:53:00 15:54:00 15:54:00 16:00:00 16:08:00 16:10:00 16:12:00 16:13:00 16:13:00 16:13:00 16:31:00 16:46:00 16:52:00 16:52:00 16:56:00 17:00:00 17:01:00 17:02:00 17:07:00 17:11:00 17:12:00


PHILIP Sarah


GUERRERO FERNANDO 17:14:00 Foster


17:17:00 17:21:00 17:26:00 17:39:00 17:43:00 17:43:00 17:46:00 17:48:00 17:51:00 17:51:00 17:55:00 17:55:00 17:56:00


66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99


100 101 102 103 104 105


Baker


Helliwell Staunton Newton Zeffert


Dave


Sampson Matt Bailey Davis


Howard Maria


Annette Richard Phil


Greenwood Gemma Adams


PRETORIUS KAREN Bowran Chilvers Campbell Smith


Sarah Bruce Mal


Davies Quant Pratt


Meade Crocker Sloan


Boulter Speake Venn


Strange Chris


Philippa James


HOLLIDAY JILL JURY


TINA Neil


Justin Kerry


Chrascina Nicky Miles Patel


Phil


Nalin Steve


Hersheson Daniel Roberts Buckle Mead


Justin Ben


Jenkins Tunna


Yearley Marriott Doran Lloyd


Elizabeth Lesley


Catherine Susan


Philippa


Jonathan James Steve


18:00:00 18:05:00 18:22:00 18:27:00 18:29:00 18:32:00 18:37:00 18:37:00 18:41:00 18:42:00 18:43:00 19:02:00 19:02:00 19:03:00 19:57:00 20:09:00


Jacqueline 20:09:00 Megan Tom


20:13:00 20:16:00 21:12:00 21:13:00 21:38:00 21:38:00 21:42:00 21:54:00 22:08:00 22:08:00 22:27:00 22:39:00 22:58:00 23:05:00 23:51:00 23:56:00


Christopher 15:48:00 Trevor


0:49:00 1:16:00 1:22:00 2:20:00 3:04:00 5:41:00


among them and has written a book to inspire and encourage those tempted to try it, with some practical advice too: A Hundred Reasons to Run 100km.


After finishing a 50-mile run on the trails in British Columbia in August 2010, Dietz decided to prepare for a 100-kilometre (62- mile) ultra three months later. The century distance is drawing an increasing number of runners worldwide. «It is the universal ultra distance,» Marathon & Beyond magazine editor Richard Benyo says in the introduction to A Hundred Reasons to Run 100km.


Vancouver’s Lucy Ryan has run four 100km ultras, finished eight Ironman triathlons and Ultraman Canada in the past four years. In 2005, the mom with a fulltime job had never run farther than a half marathon. «Running 100km gives you a ‘day off’ from regular life. It’s like a vacation of the mind—no thoughts of finances, work, what the kids are up to, etcetera—just pure survival. How often do you get to do that?» Ryan says in A Hundred Reasons to Run 100km.


A


s the popularity of endurance events including the marathon, Ironman and


adventure racing has exploded, more athletes are venturing into ultrarunning.


Squamish author Margreet Dietz, a five-time Ironman finisher and a 3:07 marathoner, is


There now are hundreds of 100km races around the world, on trails and roads. Some run from A to B, others on fixed circuits such as the Fast Trax 100km in Edmonton, Canada, which consists of 10km loops. Runners can participate on their own, or on a team.


In Oxfam Trailwalker events, which are point-


to-point races held in a dozen countries, teams of four also commit to raising money for development projects.


Jen Segger, professional endurance athlete and owner of Challenge by Choice Coaching, advises in A Hundred Reasons to Run 100km, «Choose to race your first 100km in an area that you have always wanted to see and experience. I select races based on location.»


As A Hundred Reasons to Run 100km author Margreet Dietz was finalizing her physical preparations for her century race, she started to ready herself mentally too. She knew that there would be moments during the day when she’d be asking herself why she had entered. An experienced endurance athlete, Dietz knew she’d better have at least one good answer, which turned into one for every kilometre. This book on ultrarunning offers plenty of inspiration, practical tips, and the key reason to run 100km—because you can.


«The book is a very good read—very intuitive for someone who is a veteran of ultramarathons or for those who are attempting their first century distance,» according to Nadeem Khan, director of communications, International Association of Ultrarunners.


A Hundred Reasons to Run 100km by Margreet Dietz is available in paperback (132 pages) through https://www.createspace. com/3450183 and Amazon.com.


February/March 2011 | Ultrarunning World 21


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