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CrystAl-N, Stand LED218 CrystAl-N is developing and producing single-crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) substrates for high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices. With AlN, for the first time high-performance deep UV-LEDs can be manufacturered, which will enable various applications. For example, LED-based water and air disinfection, medical diagnostics and therapy, biohazard detection and many more. www.crystal-n.com


Stand LED218


Stand LED119


Philips Lumileds, Stand LED119 At euroLED 2011, Philips Lumileds will talk about quality of light with LEDs and use the LUXEON S as an example of delivering this. LUXEON S is designed for spot and downlight, and delivers 1300 lumens at 3000K with a CRI >80. LUXEON S breaks new ground for the entire LED industry by offering the illumination market its first freedom of binning LED tested at reel operating conditions of 85C. All LUXEON S LEDs are targeted to the black body curve and populate an area within a three-step McAdam ellipse, which results in an excellent uniformity within the beam and a consistency from emitter to emitter. In addition, the LUXEON S delivers industry leading efficacy and lumen maintenance known from the LUXEON family. Philips Lumileds will be launching the LUXEON A family, which will also deliver on the quality of light and freedom of binning promise. www.philipslumileds.com


Stand


LED213 & LED214


Harvard Engineering, Stand LED213 & LED214 Harvard has extended its range of dimmable DALI CoolLED drivers to include 1.2A and 1.4A versions. Harvard’s dimmable LED drivers help users maximise their savings and reduce carbon emissions by allowing them to dim lights at specific times. The full range of DALI drivers includes: 350mA, 500mA, 700mA, 1000mA, 1.2A, and 1.4A versions. www.harvardeng.com


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