This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Here in Reading, we’re developing a new model, creating a network to enable organisations and people to work together more; sharing their skills and resources, rather than each trying to reinvent the wheel and finance it. This enabled us to launch last October’s Nuit Blanche all-nighter and at Christmas we ran a successful marketing campaign for the arts in Reading. Based on the Twelve Days of Christmas, this highlighted all that the 17 organisations taking part had achieved during 2010.


You mentor emerging artists and arts organisations. What general advice would you give them on how to succeed? Believe in yourself 100%; stay focused; don’t take a scattergun approach; keep on top of admin; learn all you can from other people and use the online networks.


What makes handmade items special for you? My grandfather was a specialist carpenter who built the pyramid


shaped roof at my primary school, whilst my grandmother and mother were great knitters and I’ve always valued the things that they made as they’re part of them. I’m drawn to this sense of handmade items carrying the artist’s fingerprint and the love, care and attention to detail that goes into them. I value things that are handmade; it feels like a privilege to have something handmade by someone else.


Any sneak previews of what we can expect next from you? A friend and I are planning to develop a series of e-books, providing online resources for emerging artists covering topics such as how to write a personal statement, putting together a portfolio, understanding your audience and the galleries you’re targeting.


For more information about Suzanne and her work visit: www.alabamawhirly.co.uk www.knithappens.etsy.com www.jelly.org.uk


Spring 2011 | ukhandmade | 55


jelly images courtesy of Salvo Toscano Photography


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